W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-style@w3.org > February 2012

RE: [css3-animations] What does animation-fill-mode do when animation-iteration-count is zero?

From: Sylvain Galineau <sylvaing@microsoft.com>
Date: Sun, 5 Feb 2012 14:11:22 +0000
To: Dean Jackson <dino@apple.com>, Tab Atkins Jr. <jackalmage@gmail.com>
CC: Řyvind Stenhaug <oyvinds@opera.com>, "www-style@w3.org" <www-style@w3.org>
Message-ID: <3C4041FF83E1E04A986B6DC50F017829034230FB@TK5EX14MBXC295.redmond.corp.microsoft.com>

[Dean Jackson:]
> 
> 
> On 02/02/2012, at 5:36 AM, Tab Atkins Jr. wrote:
> 
> > On Thu, Feb 2, 2012 at 5:30 AM, Řyvind Stenhaug <oyvinds@opera.com>
> wrote:
> >> On Thu, 02 Feb 2012 01:58:33 +0100, Sylvain Galineau
> >> <sylvaing@microsoft.com> wrote:
> >>> I assume animation-iteration-count:0 means no animation occurs and
> >>> no animation events are thrown regardless of duration and delay.
> >>>
> >>> Does animation-fill-mode have any effect in this case?
> >>
> >> When I raised this back in
> >> <http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/www-style/2011Oct/0107.html>,
> >> David argued that it would make sense to avoid a discontinuity at 0.
> >> With that reasoning,
> >>
> >> - start event and end event should dispatch at the end of the delay
> >> - fill mode 'backwards'/'both' should have an effect during the delay
> >> phase
> >> - fill mode 'forwards'/'both' should have an effect after the delay
> >> phase
> >
> > I agree with dbaron that this is the ideal behavior.
> 
> Me too. It's pretty simple to understand.
> 
Great. One asserts it's ideal, the other it's simple. I don't think it's 
either :) I don't think it's that obvious, and neither do the implementors here
asking the question; I'd like the people who it is to explain why it's obvious
and/or better than the alternative.

I also don't understand why it's important to avoid a discontinuity on something
that's unlikely to be iterated on.
Received on Sunday, 5 February 2012 14:12:05 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.3.1 : Tuesday, 26 March 2013 17:20:50 GMT