W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-style@w3.org > February 2012

Re: Mailing list traffic

From: Barton Tyner <TYNERB@ipfw.edu>
Date: Wed, 01 Feb 2012 09:41:36 -0500
Message-Id: <4F2908D00200005500079920@gwia6.ipfw.edu>
To: "Christoph Päper" <christoph.paeper@crissov.de>, "www-style@w3.org list" <www-style@w3.org>
I find it really helpful when a list like this one has a consistent
string in the subject line (e.g., [css-discuss]). This allows my email
client to recognize that string and send the message to a folder for the
list's emails. It cuts down on the amount of email that goes directly to
my inbox. Unfortunately, this list doesn't do that, and there have been
times when I've considered un-subscribing to the list for this reason.
 
I like the idea of having individual topics. Could they be prefixed
with a short consistent string that would allow email clients to detect
it for rules?
 
Thanks,
 
Bart
 
 

>>> Christoph Päper<christoph.paeper@crissov.de> Wednesday, February
01, 2012 8:43 AM >>>
Karl Dubost:
> Le 1 févr. 2012 à 06:24, Daniel Glazman a écrit :
>> end up with four times more traffic to read and digest. 

Not unlikely indeed.

> We may try as a group to label the mails, though such efforts in
large open (and changing) community is usually doom to fail.

Most threads that are specific to a certain module are labeled
accordingly, and the spec boilerplate asks everyone to do so. That’s
much more helpful than, for instance, the simplistic “[whatwg]” the
WHATWG list automatically adds to every message.

GNU Mailman supports “topics” generated from the Subject or Keywords
headers
<http://www.gnu.org/software/mailman/mailman-member/node29.html>, e.g.
by matching them to such tags. Each subscriber can then choose the
topics to receive instead of filtering threads locally (which is what I
and probably many others do currently). I assume other mailing list
software offers similar thematic opt-in or opt-out mechanisms, but I
don’t know about the one the W3C uses.
Received on Thursday, 2 February 2012 17:41:11 GMT

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