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RE: [css3-images] linear-gradient keywords and angles are opposite

From: Brian Manthos <brianman@microsoft.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2011 01:29:27 +0000
To: Brad Kemper <brad.kemper@gmail.com>, Sylvain Galineau <sylvaing@microsoft.com>
CC: "www-style@w3.org" <www-style@w3.org>, Tab Atkins Jr. <jackalmage@gmail.com>
Message-ID: <FA122FEC823D524CB516E4E0374D9DCF1FB16D62@TK5EX14MBXC136.redmond.corp.microsoft.com>
> From: Brad Kemper [mailto:brad.kemper@gmail.com]
> Sent: Wednesday, June 08, 2011 6:18 PM
> To: Sylvain Galineau
> Cc: Brian Manthos; www-style@w3.org; Tab Atkins Jr.
> Subject: Re: [css3-images] linear-gradient keywords and angles are opposite
> 
> 
> On Jun 8, 2011, at 5:36 PM, Sylvain Galineau wrote:
> 
> >>> Using that argument we might as well call it "foo" because "people
> >>> will
> >> just learn that foo means that it progresses from left to right".
> >>
> >> Not so. Currently 'left' has a clearly defined meaning of "start the
> >> gradient on the left". There is a logic to it that is not difficult
> >> to learn. It is not a totally arbitrary name.
> >
> > We know what it is *currently*. The issue is whether it should have
> > this meaning. That it can be learned is not the question either. I
> > mean, people can learn floats, too !
> 
> 
> Are you seriously arguing that "foo" is just as meaningful as "left" for this?
> Because my argument above is simply that it is not.

No.  I'm saying "foo" is better because it's LESS meaningful.

It's better to use a completely different word than to redefine:
	left (adj): the opposite of leftwards
Received on Thursday, 9 June 2011 01:30:05 GMT

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