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Re: [css3-font] Extension of font-stretch property

From: Thomas Phinney <tphinney@cal.berkeley.edu>
Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2011 19:59:24 -0800
Message-ID: <AANLkTi=CyMNg4b8rEC+Y5h+e3EvZ-jjop5H9=z9iLCvd@mail.gmail.com>
To: MasaFuji <masa@fuji.email.ne.jp>
Cc: www-style list <www-style@w3.org>
Speaking as a typographer here:

My concern is that distorted fonts are considered typographically "bad form"
and the distorted shapes look lousy. The default should be to NOT do
artificially scaled expanding/condensing, with some option to turn that
behavior on.

T

On Fri, Jan 14, 2011 at 6:30 PM, MasaFuji <masa@fuji.email.ne.jp> wrote:

> I'd like to expand the values of font-stretch property as like as font-size
> property.
>
> Name:            font-stretch
> Value:           <absolute-stretch> | <relative-stretch> | <percentage> |
> inherit
> Initial:         normal
> Applies to:      all elements
> Inherited:       yes
> Percentages:     refer to normal element's ratio
> Media:           visual
> Computed Value;  as specified
>
> Basically, this property indicates the desired font-stretch of glyphs from
> the font, in other words, the 'font-stretch' property selects a normal,
> condensed, or expanded face from a font family. It will be happy to Latin
> font families which have a various type of condensed or expanded font. When
> a font does not exist for a given width and is scalable in size, it will be
> useful the font-stretch gives a ratio of scaling in the inline progression
> direction. For scalable fonts, the font-stretch is a scale factor applied to
> the EM unit of the font. Values have the following meanings:
>
> <absolute-ratio>
>  An <absolute-ratio> keyword refers to an entry in a table of font-stretch
> ratios computed and kept by the UA. Possible values are:
>
>  [ normal | ultra-condensed | extra-condensed | condensed | semi-condensed
> | semi-expanded | expanded | extra-expanded | ultra-expanded ]
>
> Absolute keyword values have the following ordering, from narrowest to
> widest. The following table provides a sample of user agent's guideline for
> the absolute-size scaling factor. Some user agent may use a scale which
> increase geometrically.
>
> Value   Description     % of normal
> -----------------------------------
> 1       Ultra-condensed  50
> 2       Extra-condensed  62.5
> 3       Condensed        75
> 4       Semi-condensed   87.5
> 5       Medium (normal)  100
> 6       Semi-expanded    112.5
> 7       Expanded         125
> 8       Extra-expanded   150
> 9       Ultra-expanded   200
>
> <relative- ratio>
>  A <relative-ratio> keyword is interpreted relative to the table of
> font-stretch ratios and the font-stretch ratio of the parent element.
> Possible values are:
>
>  [ wider | narrower ]
>
> For example, if the parent element has a font-stretch ratio of 'normal' a
> value of 'wider' will make the font-stretch ratio of the current element be
> 'wider'. If the parent element's ratio is not close to a table entry, the
> user agent is free to interpolate between table entries or round off to the
> closest one. The user agent may have to extrapolate table values if the
> numerical value goes beyond keywords.
>
> <percentage>
>  A percentage value specifies a font-stretch ratio to the normal
> font-stretch ratio. Use of percentage values leads to more robust and
> cascadable style sheets.
>
> ************************
> Msahiro Fujishima
>
>
>
>


-- 
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 somewhere, may be happy.”
 —H.L. Mencken
Received on Saturday, 15 January 2011 03:59:57 GMT

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