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Re: [css3-text] New WD of CSS Text Level 3

From: Thomas Phinney <tphinney@cal.berkeley.edu>
Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2011 15:45:51 -0800
Message-ID: <AANLkTi=_97Typ77=_PMqaUao98TD-jzYnhiPnhKUQ-Wm@mail.gmail.com>
To: Xaxio Brandish <xaxiobrandish@gmail.com>
Cc: Bert Bos <bert@w3.org>, W3C style mailing list <www-style@w3.org>
Hi Xaxio,

I think of "script" as "a collection of characters used for languages that
share characters and a general writing system." See also
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Writing_system or
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_writing_systems

English, Spanish and German are all languages written with the Latin script.
This is why common character sets for western European languages have names
like "Latin-1" etcetera.

The Latin script is quite reasonably listed in the "discrete scripts" group.
Languages written with the Latin script all use spaces in between words, and
do not require connections between letters (like, say, Arabic does). That
defines the group.

Cheers,

T

On Fri, Feb 18, 2011 at 2:24 PM, Xaxio Brandish <xaxiobrandish@gmail.com>wrote:

> Good morning,
>
> I apologize in advance for any brashness, as it isn't intended to offend.
>
> I was looking at Section 1.1 (Script Groups) -- where do the English,
> Spanish, and German languages fall in these categories, please?  I was also
> looking for the definition of "script" as it is applied here (I searched the
> UI document and the font document as well), but couldn't find anything.
>
> How do you define it?  Does "script" mean character sets outside of ASCII,
> does it mean a script typeface as defined at
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Script_%28typefaces%29, or does it mean any
> system of letters and numbers that can be put into a readable format?
>
> update:  Just found it in UAX #24 (
> http://www.unicode.org/reports/tr24/tr24-7.html#Introduction) (perhaps
> this should be linked in the definition of script groups?), but I still
> don't understand in which Script Group one would find English, Spanish,
> French, and German.
>
> ********************************************
>
> Under Section 2, a sentence reads
>
> Conformance to CSS Text Level 3 is defined for three classes:
>>
>
> How is "class" defined here?  It's not the same as a CSS selector class
> obviously, but I was wondering if there could perhaps be better word such as
> "implementers" or "objects" used.
>
> "However the inability of a UA" should have a comma: "However, the
> inability of a UA"
>
> ********************************************
>
> Section 2.1:
>
> "This property transforms text for the styling purpose."
>>
>
> reads to me as though this MUST be used in combination with some other rule
> that accomplishes a specified purpose in order to have visible effect.
> Might this better read
>
> "This property transforms text for the purpose of styling." or "This
> property transforms the style of the target text." or "This property changes
> the styled letter-case of the target text." (as that appears to be the only
> thing it does at the moment -- is there more planned for this?)
>
> ********************************************
>
> Section 3.1 uses the word "titlecase", but according to Wikipedia, this
> isn't standardized:
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Letter_case#Choice_of_case_in_text
>
> My question in regard to that is: Should this be better defined?  I ask
> because one implementation of title-case may use "The" and another may use
> "the" (which can PO quite a few authors [both CSS authors and book
> authors]).  If a CSS author uses title-case and finds that "The" capitalizes
> differently on different browsers, that could be reason to go back into the
> source document and manually capitalize the text there.  The spread of that
> kind of frustration could cause this property to be ignored in key places in
> more widely used publications.
>
> ********************************************
>
> Section 4 states
>
> Note that the document parser may have not only normalized segment breaks,
>>
>
> How is the adjective "normalized" meant to be applied to "segment break"?
> Are form feeds (U+000C?) explicitly NOT considered to be white space, and if
> so, should that be stated; how should they be handled, if at all?
>
> I see "<span class="issue">Copied from CSS2.1 but this has got to be
> wrong.</span>" -- for a minute, I thought that was part of the text!  I had
> to go into the source to see that it isn't.  I'll add a userstyle override
> on my side to make that a red background with white writing so I don't
> confuse those things...
>
> ********************************************
> Section 4.1:
>
> I see
>
> Rename to white-space-trim or white-space-adjust?
>>
>
> Out of the two, "adjust" seems to make more sense, since collapse and trim
> aren't the only options here; "white-space-behaviour" and
> "white-space-treatment" also seem viable.
>
> ********************************************
>
> Section 4.2, numbered list 2, item 2 states
>
> Each tab (U+0009) is rendered as a horizontal shift that lines up the start
>> edge of the next glyph with the next tab stop. Tab stops occur at points
>> that are multiples of 8 times the width of a space (U+0020) rendered in the
>> block's font from the block's starting content edge..
>>
>
> For certain documents (mobile, possibly others), 8 times with width of a
> space can be a LOT of screen real-estate.  Can there be a property to define
> "tab-stop" rather than a hard rule?
>
> ********************************************
>
> Section 4.3
>
> I see the values "pre-wrap" and "pre-line".  While I understand the meaning
> of "pre" in this context, the first reading of it gives the impression of
> "before the wrap" and "before the line".  Is it okay to go ahead and spell
> out the full word "preserve" for this value?
>
> --Xaxio
>
>
> On Thu, Feb 17, 2011 at 6:40 AM, Bert Bos <bert@w3.org> wrote:
>
>> The CSS WG published an update of the CSS Text module:
>>
>>    http://www.w3.org/TR/2011/WD-css3-text-20110215/
>>
>> This module covers line breaking, justification and alignment, white
>> space handling, text decoration and text transformation.
>>
>> The section "Changes" briefly lists the features that have changed since
>> the draft of last October:
>>
>>    http://www.w3.org/TR/2011/WD-css3-text-20110215/#recent-changes
>>
>> As usual, we ask that all comments on the draft be sent to this mailing
>> list, <www-style@w3.org>, with a subject line that starts with
>>
>>    [css3-text]
>>
>>
>>
>> Bert
>> --
>>  Bert Bos                                ( W 3 C ) http://www.w3.org/
>>  http://www.w3.org/people/bos                               W3C/ERCIM
>>  bert@w3.org                             2004 Rt des Lucioles / BP 93
>>  +33 (0)4 92 38 76 92            06902 Sophia Antipolis Cedex, France
>>
>>
>


-- 
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 somewhere, may be happy.”
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Received on Friday, 18 February 2011 23:46:26 GMT

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