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Re: [css3-lists] CJK numbering algorithms

From: David Singer <singer@apple.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Apr 2011 21:55:48 -0700
Cc: www-style@w3.org
Message-id: <E647A1D3-C7FD-49CD-82A3-D3D5D51A889A@apple.com>
To: fantasai <fantasai.lists@inkedblade.net>

On Apr 22, 2011, at 13:07 , fantasai wrote:

> On 04/21/2011 04:48 PM, Tab Atkins Jr. wrote:
>> I've made the change and rearranged the sections accordingly.  Can
>> everyone check out
>> <http://dev.w3.org/csswg/css3-lists/#cjk-counter-styles>  and make sure
>> I haven't done anything dumb?
> 
> Editorial comments. Because I hate the "set the foo flag" style of spec-writing.
> 
> 
> I suggest s/"spoken-out"/longhand/g;
> 
> # Chinese, Japanese, and Korean all share almost identical "spoken-out"
> # counter styles, which are roughly similar to using "one, two, three..."
> # in English.
> 
> Replace with
> 
> | Chinese, Japanese, and Korean have longhand counter styles, which
> | have a structure similar to "one hundred thirteen thousand and
> | twenty-three" in English.
> 
> Insert
> 
> |                          There are formal and informal variants.
> | Note: The formal styles tend to be used in financial and legal
> | documents as their characters more difficult to alter.

insert 'are' before 'more' ...?

> |
> | These counter styles are defined below:
> |
> | <dl>
> |   <dt>simp-chinese-informal</dt>
> |     <dd>The simplified Chinese informal style
> |   <dt>simp-chinese-formal</dt>
> |     <dd>The traditional Chinese formal style
> |   <dt>trad-chinese-formal</dt>
> |     <dd>The traditional Chinese informal style
> |   ...
> |   <dt>cjk-ideographic</dt>
> |     <dd>For legacy reasons, this counter-style is defined as an alias
> |       for trad-chinese-informal.
> | </dl>
> 
> This gives the reader an up-front overview of what they're dealing with.
> You could even toss in an example or two into those definitions. It'll
> also help web authors a lot, because they can now stop reading this
> section: they already have a clear idea of what styles are available
> and what they each mean.
> 
> # The Chinese and Japanese styles are defined ... less than 10^16.
> 
> Append:
> 
> | For numbers outside this range, the cjk-decimal style must be used.
> 
> and start a new paragraph for the intro to your algorithm.
> 
> 
> Remove item two (setting the negative flag) and replace item nine with:
> 
> | 9. If the counter is negative, replace the negative sign with the
> |    appropriate symbol.
> 
> Also, we're starting with a decimal representation. The algorithm just
> runs a bunch of filters on the string, and the groups are just ways of
> keeping track of parts of it. Nothing's getting reordered around, so
> we don't need to make things overly complicated. This:
> 
> # Recombine groups:
> #   For the Chinese and Japanese styles, concatenate the groups back into
> #   a single string, least significant group first (on the right).
> #   For the Korean styles, concatenate the groups back into a single
> #   string, least significant group first (on the right), with a space
> #  (  U+0020) inserted between each group.
> 
> makes me think too much. Which is why I just had
> 
> 9. Insert spaces (U+0020) between groups for the Korean styles.
> 
> My brain is not a computer. Please don't make it think like one. I don't
> have enough RAM to pretend I'm a computer. Keeping track of arbitrary
> flags and indices is hard. Sophisticated structures like a string that
> has various parts of it labelled differently, however, are easy. It's
> less "things" because it's one "thing".
> 
> 
> Lastly, combine and split up the tables like I did in
>  http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/www-style/2011Apr/0621.html
> 
> This puts the data right where you're dealing with it in the algorithm,
> so you don't have to track across screens as you're trying to understand
> what's going on. It splits the different types of characters according
> to their roles in the algorithm, to help you understand how they are
> different. It also puts all the styles parallel to each other, so you
> can easily see the similarities in structure and differences in character
> across the styles.
> 
> ~fantasai
> 

David Singer
Multimedia and Software Standards, Apple Inc.
Received on Saturday, 23 April 2011 04:56:17 GMT

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