W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-style@w3.org > October 2010

Re: [css-device-adaptation] New draft

From: Kenneth Rohde Christiansen <kenneth.christiansen@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Oct 2010 17:06:20 -0300
Message-ID: <AANLkTimdhPZQYnE86hzE7rtSfQT4-akS2VX60BXNeoO7@mail.gmail.com>
To: Rune Lillesveen <rune@opera.com>
Cc: www-style@w3.org
The idea is that on let's say a high dpi Android phone, the default contents
will be scaled by 1.5 (ie scale 1.0 becomes 1.5, scale 2.0 becomes 3.0),
making it look exactly like on the iPhone, but not pixel perfect, thus not
taking advantage of the higher dpi. A page instead can say
"targetDensityDpi=device-dpi" and the page will not do the 1.5 scaling, thus
making the css pixel / device pixel 1:1. It should then be possible for the
web site to query the dpi using -webkit-device-pixel-ratio and include a
different CSS style.

Kenneth

On Tue, Oct 19, 2010 at 4:57 PM, Rune Lillesveen <rune@opera.com> wrote:

> On Tue, 19 Oct 2010 17:43:11 +0200, Simon Fraser <smfr@me.com> wrote:
>
>  On Oct 19, 2010, at 4:10 AM, Rune Lillesveen wrote:
>>
>>  Could dpi values for zoom be an acceptable replacement for
>>> target-densityDpi?
>>>
>>> Examples:
>>>
>>>  /* Set the zoom factor so that there is a 1-1 relationship between
>>> physical and CSS pixels */
>>>  @viewport {
>>>   zoom: device-dpi
>>>  }
>>>
>>
>> If you did this, you'd get different behavior on an iPhone 3Gs and an
>> iPhone 4 (which has the double-resolution Retina display). I don't think
>> that's the desired behavior. I'd suggest staying away from physical pixels
>> here.
>>
>
> Yes, that's the idea of the target-densityDpi extension if I understand it
> correctly. I'd be happy to leave it out, I'm just trying to understand why
> it's needed.
>
>
> --
> Rune Lillesveen
> Senior Core Developer / Architect
> Opera Software ASA
>
>


-- 
Kenneth Rohde Christiansen
Senior Engineer
Nokia Danmark A/S
Phone  +55 81 8895 6002 / E-mail kenneth.christiansen at gmail.com

http://codeposts.blogspot.com ﹆﹆﹆
Received on Tuesday, 19 October 2010 20:07:18 GMT

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