W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-style@w3.org > November 2010

Re: [css3-ui] styling of form elements

From: David Woolley <forums@david-woolley.me.uk>
Date: Sun, 14 Nov 2010 10:32:51 +0000
Message-ID: <4CDFBAD3.5020903@david-woolley.me.uk>
To: www-style list <www-style@w3.org>
Andrew Fedoniouk wrote:
>> On Nov 13, 2010, at 4:19 PM, "Andrew Fedoniouk" 
>> <andrew.fedoniouk@live.com> wrote:
>>> Usually browser window is open in full. Anyone can create inside 
>>> something that looks like standard OS window.
>> I guess you don't use Mac, then. I sometimes wonder why Microsoft 
>> didn't name their OS "fullscreens", since so many of it's users.seem 

I very rarely use Windows windows maximised.  Application specifiers 
often design on a full windows basis because they think their 
application should be considered so important that no-one would want to 
have anything else open at the same time.

>> to distain the concept of multiple overlapping windows. In my own 
>> usage, I very often have popup minus that extend outside the window.
> I do not understand your concerns then, sorry.
> On iPhone OS you can create web page/app that will span full screen 
> without even traces of browser's chrome.
> And there you can mimic any standard elements of the OS so they will be 
> indistinguishable from native application.
> What problem do you see with that?

The obvious security one - it's a phisher's charter.

Also, it assumes that you have accounted for every OSes user interface, 
and, in the case of X-Windows, at least, every possible window manager 
and user configuration of such.  That includes the ones not yet released.

Mimicing OS controls, rather than using them directly, is a very common 
want imposed on designers, but it is bad user interface practice.

David Woolley
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Received on Sunday, 14 November 2010 10:33:23 UTC

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