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Re: [css3-background] possibly too late for last call, but: background-opacity?

From: Lee Owen <fleeboy@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2009 21:15:21 +0100
Cc: www-style@w3.org
Message-Id: <23DC71EE-31AB-45EE-A782-40F0F817FF60@gmail.com>
To: Brad Kemper <brad.kemper@gmail.com>
Thanks for your reply and your drop-shadow proposal page! Thats a very  
flexible approach.

Could you target specific background images in a multi-background  
element? For example:

  opacity:0.5; apply-to(opacity, background-image(1,2,4) + background- 
color);

and would these properties be able to be animated?


regards,

Lee

--------------
Lee Owen
==================================
lee@fleeboy.com | www.twitter.com/fleeboy
www.fleeboy.com | www.creativefront.co.uk
==================================




On 15 Oct 2009, at 18:40, Brad Kemper wrote:

> On Oct 15, 2009, at 8:27 AM, Lee Owen wrote:
>
>> I would like to second Patrick's recommendation for "background- 
>> opacity".
>>
>> I have been using transparent png's also but I would like to  
>> animate this opacity over time using css transitions or jquery. The  
>> effect would be great with multiple backgrounds using animated  
>> opacity depending on user interaction.
>>
>> Please consider this.
>>
>>
>> regards,
>>
>> Lee
>>
>> --------------
>> Lee Owen
>> ==================================
>> lee@fleeboy.com | www.twitter.com/fleeboy
>> www.fleeboy.com | www.creativefront.co.uk
>> ==================================
>>
>
> In my proposal for 'drop-shadow' [1], I had a function within a  
> value to limit what parts of the element get the CSS drop shadow  
> applied to them, using a notation like this:
>
> apply-to(border + foreground, background-image + background-color)
>
> But recently, I've been thinking this could instead be a separate  
> property, like this:
>
> apply-effect: drop-shadow, border + foreground, background-image +  
> background-color;
>
> In which case it could also be used for opacity, visibility, display  
> (maybe, if very limited), and maybe some other properties. The  
> properties and values would still be written as normal, but this  
> extra property would limit how they were applied for the given  
> selector (the rest of the element would get the default values). So  
> for what you want, you could do something like this:
>
> opacity:0.5; apply-to(opacity, background-image + background-color);
>
>
>
>
> [1] http://www.bradclicks.com/cssplay/drop-shadow/Drop-Shadow.html
>
Received on Thursday, 15 October 2009 20:15:53 GMT

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