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Re: [CSS3 Colors] HSL colors, hue and allowed values, [CSS3 gcpm] CMYK colors and allowed values.

From: Chris Murphy <lists@colorremedies.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Jul 2009 12:25:49 -0400
Cc: W3C style mailing list <www-style@w3.org>, Ludger Buenger <ludger.buenger@realobjects.com>
Message-Id: <008C317B-83D9-4FA2-9D14-7F1F7A6F4294@colorremedies.com>
To: Brad Kemper <brad.kemper@gmail.com>
Yes I kinda get the whole different gamut thing (see sig).

I'd like to read of some examples of these "some applications of CSS".  
Who is asking for this? Lithography, flexography, gravure printers?  
With inkjet, digital presses, and electrostatic printers, why would  
CSS need to specify color in CMYK? It's an extremely device dependent  
color space. The color you get depends on the device, paper, inkjset,  
ambient temperature and humidity, etc. I don't see the value in  
supporting CMYK at all. Especially given limited resources how much  
better the market would be served by fully supporting ICC in CSS  
without having to embed ICC profiles in every single RGB image.

Is CSS being used as or integrated into output device languages?



Chris Murphy
Color Remedies (TM)
New York, NY
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Co-author "Real World Color Management, 2nd Ed"


On Jul 29, 2009, at 12:07 PM, Brad Kemper wrote:

> RGB is probably good enough for Web browsers, but for some  
> applications of CSS, how the colors look on paper will be much more  
> important than how they look on a monitor. If you are familiar with  
> (or have some control over)  the color space of the output device,  
> you can get much more exact results with CMYK than you can by  
> converting from RGB, which has a different gamut.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jul 29, 2009, at 8:24 AM, Chris Murphy <lists@colorremedies.com>  
> wrote:
>
>> Why even support CMYK in the first place? It's an output device  
>> dependent color model. Without an explicit color space assumed or  
>> defined by everything that comes into contact with those CMYK  
>> values, there is no way to display them correctly. I wouldn't touch  
>> this with a 10 foot pole. Such color spaces are defined by ~2-3MB  
>> ICC profiles.
Received on Wednesday, 29 July 2009 16:26:31 GMT

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