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Re: Re[6]: css with attribues [off-topic]

From: Brad Kemper <brkemper@comcast.net>
Date: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 09:19:29 -0800
Message-Id: <9ABCAE44-5583-4FC5-A54D-56539737E09D@comcast.net>
Cc: www-style@w3.org
To: Dmitry Turin <sql4-en@narod.ru>

On Jan 25, 2008, at 1:58 AM, Dmitry Turin wrote:

>>> Usually corporations accept rules, mandatory for all employee.
>>> How Bob give freedom to litter ?
> BK> I see that you've never worked in a large, diverse corporation.  
> Did
> BK> you think that the CEOs and Vice Presidents are all coding experts
> BK> who review each line of code for targeted cruft-removal?
>
> I supposed, that nearly each line of code is dictated in Western
> (at least, it's widespread myth about Western countries).

Not to pick on Microsoft, but a glance at the HTML on their home page  
should disabuse you of that notion.

I cannot speak for corporation whose entire business is writing code.  
But at least with many other businesses, decisions are often made  
about the Web based on what people see on their screen, not on what  
code is used to generate those screens. It would be nice, perhaps, if  
all the CEOs, board members, and Vice Presidents were all code  
experts (HTML, CSS, C++, or whatever was being written) who could  
look at the code their company produced and appreciate the level of  
craftsmanship (or lack thereof). I don't think that happens all that  
often, though, unless perhaps, if the company was founded by a coder.  
At some point the executives trust that they made good hiring  
decisions, and that those under them made good hiring decisions, and  
that those they hired write at the level that is needed (and  
sometimes they only need (or think they need) quick, messy hacks).

Open source program code is likely to fare better, I would think, due  
to the number of people actually examining the code.
Received on Friday, 25 January 2008 17:19:45 GMT

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