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flowing around both sides of a float Re: float:center (was: Re: Alignment property proposal)

From: Peter Moulder <Peter.Moulder@infotech.monash.edu.au>
Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2007 18:01:29 +1100
To: www-style@w3.org
Message-id: <20071231070129.GA11651@bowman.infotech.monash.edu.au>

On 29 Dec 2007, James Elmore wrote:

> Some magazines used to position an image or 'pull out quote' in the
> middle of articles. While I have seen the more common 'float between
> columns', I have also seen the text reflowed so the words just skip
> the area where the float is and continue on the other side. (This
> works best with wide columns and small floats.)  I even recall some
> articles with three (narrower) columns where the 'float' caused margin
> changes in the left and right columns, and caused the text to skip
> over the image in the center column.

On Sun, Dec 30, 2007 at 09:57:49PM -0800, Brad Kemper wrote:
> I agree with the examples James Elmore gives in his December 29, 2007 post.

I don't.

Every pull quote that I've seen other than in web pages either overlaps
multiple columns (so that no single column flows on both sides of the
float) or takes up the full width of one column.

In web pages (given that columns aren't really available yet[*]), the
pull quote is typically in a left or right float, or sometimes a display
float (i.e. taking up the full column).

[*]: See http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-multicol/ and associated discussion
 for its status as regards CSS specs.  It happens that I've worked on
 implementations related to this and float placement myself: see e.g.
 http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1284455 .

>> having each line skip something wide in the center and move to the
>> other side doesn't work well either.
>
> Why not?

Because it's hard to read, needlessly hard given the other alternatives
mentioned above.

(Also, it's hard to implement, once one considers bidi and optimal line
breaking.)

pjrm.
Received on Monday, 31 December 2007 07:01:40 GMT

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