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RE: CSS Generated content selection

From: Patrick Lauke <P.H.Lauke@salford.ac.uk>
Date: Mon, 23 Apr 2007 17:07:35 +0100
Message-ID: <2B0B7306F468E54D84D79904FA2A0140B2CACB@ISD-EXV03.isdads.salford.ac.uk>
To: <www-style@w3.org>

> Spartanicus

> Does that mean that you support the omission of punctuation at the end
> of the paragraph that precedes another paragraph or list?

No, as that still doesn't address those other situations (exclamation mark, question mark, ..., etc)

> >Inline quotes, on the other hand, are not clearly delimited  
> >when copy/pasting if the quotes aren't included.
> Which is why I said that quotes around inline quotations 
> should be part
> of the content proper.

So you're pointing at the current behaviour of browsers (which I'm arguing here as being flawed) to justify using a workaround? The <q> element unambiguously defines where the quote starts or ends. The browser should present this visually by adding quotes (or guillemets, or whatever depending on language-specific rules). When copy/pasting, this delimitation should also be passed along as part of the plain text. IMO, of course.

Otherwise, a similar example would be: by default, browsers do a line break and give some space between paragraphs marked via <p>. When copy/pasting, the line break is copied over as well. To take the same approach as you're suggesting for <q>, you could say that a browser that simply lumps paragraphs together into a single line is doing the right thing, and that if the line break was important, authors should have added them in their markup.

> I'd question the value of doing so. I'm not a supporter of coding
> semantics purely for semantics sake, otherwise there'd be a case for
> <verb> etc.

> Can you present a use case where the distinction is relevant if the
> ability to reference by marker is dealt with by including such
> references as part of the content proper?

I'm not talking about referencing by marker. I'm talking about denoting, in a copy/pasted bit of text, that something was an ordered list rather than an unordered one.

Patrick H. Lauke
Web Editor
External Relations Division
University of Salford
Room 113, Faraday House
Salford, Greater Manchester
M5 4WT

T +44 (0) 161 295 4779


Received on Monday, 23 April 2007 16:07:00 GMT

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