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Re: Rendering of Svg Font

From: David Woolley <david@djwhome.demon.co.uk>
Date: Tue, 7 Nov 2006 22:01:13 +0000 (GMT)
Message-Id: <200611072201.kA7M1DY02955@djwhome.demon.co.uk>
To: www-style@w3.org

> J> The following font rendering rules for Malayalam (Indic language) are 
> J> handled by operating system itself in the case of normal fonts.
> 
> Normal fonts?

I think he means OpenType etc.  I'm assuming that, by SVG Fonts, he
means fonts completely written in SVG.

He's then either hand authored them, but not realised that you need to
define ligatures, or he's used a conversion tool that isn't suitable
for Indic languages.

Specifically, for this example:

] J> Malayalam letter KA (0D15) + Malayalam Vowel sign E (0D46) has to be
] J> rendered as Malayalam Vowel sign E (0D46) + Malayalam letter KA (0D15)

there needs to be a glyph element with the unicode attribute containing
the string composed of U+0D15 followed by U+0D46 ("&#xd15;&#xd46")
and the contents of that element should draw the combination of both
consonant and vowel.

(I'm working from a very old draft here, so it is possible that I've
assumed something that is no longer present.)

Incidentally, my impression is that, at least for North Indian scripts
(Malayalam is from Kerala in South India), children are taught the
script as though it was syllabic, so the glyphs they are taught are the
combination ones.

> 
> I wonder if perhaps your question is about specific renderers and

That's possible, as well.

* platforms, rather than being about  SVG in general?
Received on Tuesday, 7 November 2006 22:12:44 GMT

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