W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-style@w3.org > July 2006

Re: Search Engine CSS

From: Craig Francis <craig@synergycms.com>
Date: Thu, 6 Jul 2006 21:22:15 +0100
Message-Id: <F819C1D0-1197-445F-9B42-6CD68E840FCC@synergycms.com>
To: www-style@w3.org

Hi Patrick,

Thank you very much, I did not realise that these were being developed.

If anyone is interested the relevant links are at:

http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml2/mod-role.html#col_Role
http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml2/mod-list.html#sec_11.2.


Best Regards,
Craig





On 6 Jul 2006, at 00:33, Patrick H. Lauke wrote:

> Craig Francis wrote:
>
>> A fair point, but please can you explain which is the correct  
>> method of marking up the headers (first example given, under the  
>> heading "my problem").
>
> There is no one true correct way of doing anything within the  
> limited vocabulary offered by HTML. Whether something is an H1 or  
> H2 will matter to search engines, but it's only one of many  
> "ingredients" that will influence a page's ranking and indexing.
>
>> Personally I think presentation effects interpretation, and the  
>> rules I propose are for changing that interpretation and not the  
>> structure of the page.
>
> Presentation may affect *subjective* interpretation, but meaning  
> should not be imparted solely via styling. A document needs to be  
> understandable without styles.
>
>> For example a <ul> of links is because they are an unordered list  
>> of links... its then presented to the user/device to show that its  
>> a navigation bar... but I suppose that interpretation could also  
>> be expressed in mark-up. Although how would you create all the  
>> HTML elements required for all the different data types (there  
>> could be allot)... I suppose they could be attributes (<ul  
>> type="nav">).
>
> This goes outside of the www-style list...the www-html list may be  
> a more appropriate forum for this. Suffice to say: HTML offers a  
> very limited set of elements. Beyond microformats or similar  
> attempts at cramming further semantics into the very generic  
> elements, or using linked resources (such as RDF files, for  
> instance), there's not much you can do - and even there, you're  
> relying on search engines actually caring about any of those  
> things. As an aside, I remember how at some point MAP was touted as  
> being a good markup structure for navigation etc...
> You may want to look at the proposed developments in XHTML 2.0  
> (specifically the "role" attribute and navigation list element)
>
> P
> -- 
> Patrick H. Lauke
> __________________________________________________________
> re·dux (adj.): brought back; returned. used postpositively
> [latin : re-, re- + dux, leader; see duke.]
> www.splintered.co.uk | www.photographia.co.uk
> http://redux.deviantart.com
> __________________________________________________________
> Web Standards Project (WaSP) Accessibility Task Force
> http://webstandards.org/
> __________________________________________________________
Received on Thursday, 6 July 2006 20:22:41 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.2.0+W3C-0.50 : Monday, 27 April 2009 13:54:45 GMT