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Re: Downloadable fonts and image replacement

From: Spartanicus <spartanicus.3@ntlworld.ie>
Date: Wed, 26 Apr 2006 10:53:53 +0100
Message-ID: <n2m-g.gnfu425ooqnssv17tkvahtgnpmrsqbfn4e@news.spartanicus.utvinternet.ie>
To: www-style@w3.org

Håkon Wium Lie <howcome@opera.com> wrote:

> > >  http://www.csszengarden.com/?cssfile=176/176.css
> > >
> > >The page is beautiful, funny, and it mixes images and text. And, it's
> > >pretty accessible.
>
> > For this page to become accessible I need to disable CSS
>
>Sure. That's one of the reasons for separating style from structure --
>you can easily remove the style. Shift-G in Opera.

My point is that because it can sort of [1] be made accessible by
disabling stylesheets this doesn't mean that there aren't huge
accessibility issues with such techniques.

Imo CSS Zengarden has done and is continuing to do a disservice to the
cause of demonstrating what CSS is about, and proper web authoring in
general. It falsely suggests that CSS as currently implemented by the
lowest common denominator (IE) it is capable of fundamentally changing
the layout and look of a site. To create this illusion it litters the
markup with spurious code which makes the code inflexible and difficult
to maintain. They themselves warn against emulating their methods for
real world web authoring, but few people notice that. CSS Zengarden sets
a bad example.

[1] Disabling stylesheets causes part of the content to disappear since
it was inappropriately moved to CSS.

-- 
Spartanicus

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Received on Wednesday, 26 April 2006 09:54:23 GMT

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