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"::inside" Pseudo-Element

From: Daniel Schierbeck <daniel.schierbeck@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 2005 16:14:15 +0100
Message-ID: <43B54EC7.6070205@gmail.com>
To: www-style@w3.org

Hello. I've just subscribed to this list, so don't hate me if I'm 
reapeting what's already been said. I tried to search the archives to 
get an answer to my question, but I couldn't find anything clear.

Is there a reason the "::outside" pseudo-element is included in the 
Generated and Replaced Content Module, but "::inside" isn't?

I often find myself using nested DIV tags when I write XHTML documents. 
That way I can position the "content" area of the document through CSS.

  ...
  <body>
    <div id="wrap">
      <div id="header"/>
      <div id="nav"/>
      <div id="content"/>
      <div id="footer"/>
    </div>
  </body>

  #wrap {
    width: 500px;
    margin: 50px auto;
  }

I want to be able to skip the #wrap element, since it adds neither 
semantics nor structure to the document (it's the only child of the BODY 
element)
As you can see, "::ouside" won't do what I want here (assuming it's a 
bad idea to generate a pseudo-element *outside* the BODY element).

This seems to me like a far more elegant solution:

   ...
  <body>
    <div id="header"/>
    <div id="nav"/>
    <div id="content"/>
    <div id="footer"/>
  </body>

  body::inside {
    width: 500px;
    margin: 50px auto;
  }

, since the seperation of structure/markup and presentation is clearer 
(i.e. there are no elements for the sake of presentation alone.)

This issue has probably already been debated on this list, but I'd 
appreciate if I could either be given an explanation of why the 
pseudo-element isn't in the current draft, or a reference to such an 
explanation.


Thank you very much for your time,
Daniel Schierbeck

Odense, Denmark
Received on Saturday, 31 December 2005 07:47:33 GMT

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