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Re: Font Size options

From: Barry <barry@polisource.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Apr 2005 01:29:22 -0400
Message-ID: <000301c540b2$eb6b47c0$2f01a8c0@Seka>
To: <www-style@w3.org>

I wrote:
> Also, there
> are a few different methods that publishers use to layout article titles 
> of
> various lengths, to make them look good. One method it to align the first
> half of the title to the left, and the second half to the right on the 
> next
> line.

I found a similar example at 
http://www.rcmpmuseum.com/museum/images/trapper.jpg by searching Google 
images for "headlines." I found only one text reference to that "stepped" 
style, at http://www.luc.edu/faculty/owitte/copyedit/b11Heads.pdf . The 
style described in the first paragraph below would be nice to have done 
automatically with CSS too.

"7. Most newspapers run headlines flush left, which means that each line of 
a head starts at the left margin of the space provided for it and ends at a 
variable distance near the right margin. The usual goal is to come as close 
as possible to filling its line and, if the head has more than one line, to 
make each line about the same width. At a minimum, a headline for more than 
one column must extend at least a letter or two into the last column.

"A few publications are bringing back justified, centered or stepped 
headlines. Justified type fills its line. One formerly popular technique 
still used by the New York Times calls for three lines of identical width, 
the first flush left, the second centered and the third flush right. Another 
oldfashioned way to handle a three-line head is to fill the first line and 
center the others, each of which is shorter than the previous line. The 
effect looks like an inverted pyramid." 



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Received on Thursday, 14 April 2005 05:29:15 GMT

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