W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-style@w3.org > May 2004

Re: [css3-hyperlinks] Comments about the New Draft

From: Lachlan Hunt <lachlan.hunt@iinet.net.au>
Date: Wed, 19 May 2004 18:03:10 +1000
Message-ID: <40AB14BE.4010400@iinet.net.au>
To: Brian Sexton <discussion-w3c@ididnotoptin.com>
Cc: www-style <www-style@w3.org>

Brian Sexton wrote:
> Greetings.
> 
> 
>>The 'target-name' property
>>   Except for 'current', the other properties may cause unexpected
>>actions such as opening a new window/tab and replacing a frameset.
>>Therefore, I think it should be stated that the UA SHOULD/MUST make the
>>  action known to the user, through a UA specific means, prior to
>>activation.
> 
> I do not agree that user agents should or must provide notifications for
> target-name property values other than "current"; such notifications could
> be very disruptive in innocuous page designs.
<snip/>
> If a
> confirmation window pops up each time the user clicks on a root link, such a
> usable arrangement would become tedious.

   When I wrote that way back in February [1], I did not intend for it 
to be interpreted as: /show obtrusive and annoying confirmation messages 
every time a user clicks the link/.  What I meant was that there should 
be some kind of indication made *prior to activation*.  I was thinking 
along the lines of a status bar message/icon or something that the user 
can glance at before clicking, but I didn't want to go into 
implementation details since all UAs are different, which is why I said 
“UA specific means”.

   This indication would then allow the user to override this option 
through some other UA specific means, such as middle-clicking, 
shift+clicking, selecting from a context menu or some other method to 
open the link however the user wanted.

> And what if a Web developer wants to target all local links at the root of
> the document hierarchy to escape framesets from other domains?

   Good point, but I think this really should be the user's choice 
whether they want to stay within or break out of framesets, however the 
most popular UA doesn't really make this easy for the /average/ user. 
Mozilla does via a context menu, but unfortunately most people use IE 
(but that's their problem anyway).

> I am not a security expert, but here is an example of a user agent option to
> prevent security issues that may arise from link targets (such as spoofing
> other Web sites):
<snip>sample user options for setting notifications about link 
targets</snip>

   Of course, UAs should usually always provide options about the 
notifications that should be given, and how they should be given, but I 
think the exact implementation details should be left up to the software 
vendors.

[1] http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/www-style/2004Feb/0501.html
-- 
Lachlan Hunt

http://www.lachy.id.au/
lachlan.hunt@lachy.id.au
Received on Wednesday, 19 May 2004 04:03:31 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.2.0+W3C-0.50 : Monday, 27 April 2009 13:54:30 GMT