W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-style@w3.org > September 2003

Re: Scrollbar Code

From: Charles Kendrick <charles@isomorphic.com>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2003 13:07:25 -0700
Message-ID: <3F62277D.8040903@isomorphic.com>
To: David Woolley <david@djwhome.demon.co.uk>
Cc: www-style@w3.org

You didn't take my point: creating styling directives for a scrollbar doesn't imply that scrollbars 
must exist, just as creating visual styling directives doesn't imply that a screen has to exist.

Countless companies have shipped HTML UIs that take advantage of IE's scrollbar styling to create a 
more consistent look.  People really want this.  It's easy and optional.  Why not add it?

Note that, as has been discussed here before, if CSS were to include scrollbar styling capabilities, 
it probably shouldn't copy IE's highly Windows-specific model, but rather do something like define 
pseudo-elements for the thumb, track, and buttons, so that a full CSS class could be applied to each.

David Woolley wrote:

>>Nor even that a screen, or any means of visual presentation, exists.
> 
> * But I hope that no one would
> 
>>argue that this means CSS should not contain any visual styling support.
> 
> 
> There is the implication that there is a device that supports visual
> styling, but the only requirement for scrolling is that there be some
> means to scroll parts of the display.  That means could be a mouse roller
> wheel, or dragging the display, e.g. Acrobat Reader can scroll but doesn't
> have scroll bars.  These are therefore in different categories:
> one is fundamental to visual CSS; the other is a consequence of the user
> interface conventions of particular graphical user interface environments.
> 
Received on Friday, 12 September 2003 16:08:25 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.2.0+W3C-0.50 : Monday, 27 April 2009 13:54:23 GMT