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Re: CSS 4?

From: Dylan Schiemann <dylans@yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2003 12:55:13 -0700
Message-ID: <3F983221.2040402@yahoo.com>
To: www-style@w3.org

>>>>>Or, using CSS, turn the things above (or anything) into a PDF?
>>>>
>>>>There are several CSS-to-PDF systems available.
>>>
>>>In a very limited way.
>>
>>The current CSS-to-PDF systems are very advanced, easily as advanced as
>>the XSL:FO-to-PDF systems in my limited experience. 
> 
> 
> Apache FOP is pretty limited, but there are some other ones (renderX) out
> there that can do quite a bit more.
> 
> 
>>Of course, why you
>>would want to take perfectly accessible XHTML+CSS and turn it into
>>device-dependent, non-user-configurable PDF is beyond me.
> 
> 
> :) me too. We have an ASP based CMS and I totally refuse to use (generate)
> it mainly because of the processing power required. For our print friendly
> pages we just present a stripped down HTML version of a page/folder/site.
> BTW, (if we are in control) we only output valid HTML, CSS and are 508
> compliant :)

For what it's worth, we've found one use for this so far... when people 
enter information that you're then sending directly to a publisher. 
Think web interface for creating a journal article that allows the user 
to type in their information.  We then return an html view for people to 
read, and a pdf view to send to the journal.

The needs of this system were pretty simple, so we just used XSLT, 
XSL-FO, and Apache FOP.  The XSL-FO was surprisingly straighforward and 
possibly easier to work with than XHTML+CSS, though all semantic meaning 
in the pdf is lost.

-Dylan

--
Dylan Schiemann
http://www.sitepen.com/
http://www.dylanschiemann.com/
Received on Thursday, 23 October 2003 15:57:06 GMT

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