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Re: Proposed Additions to list-style-type based on Unicode 4.0

From: Chris Lilley <chris@w3.org>
Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2003 09:56:40 +0100
Message-ID: <17030163468.20030320095640@w3.org>
To: ftang@netscape.com (Yung-Fong Tang)
CC: Ernest Cline <ernestcline@mindspring.com>, www-style@w3.org

On Thursday, March 20, 2003, 2:37:09 AM, Yung-Fong wrote:




YFT> Ernest Cline wrote:

>>I was going over the characters that are added in the Unicode 4.0 beta.

Yes, its fascinating. Note that many of these characters are not yet
approved and might not appear in Unicode 4. Its certainly possible to
start discussion, but unaproved scripts should probably not be used in
a CSS3 Rec.

>>Some of these suggest additions to the list-style-types supported by CSS3.
>>
>>aegean:
>>
>>Type: Algotithmic
>>Source: http://www.unicode.org/charts/PDF/U40-10100.pdf
>>Range: 1-99999
>>Code Points Used: 36 (U+10107 to U+10133 inclusive)

Where did you get the name Algotithmic from? It seems to be called
Aegean Numbers.

YFT> Do you have any description about how does the number system work ?

The PDF shows that there are different symbols for units, tens,
hundreds and thousands. It would certainly need an algorithm to be
specified although I can make a reasoned guess, knowing the aegean
scripts were written from left to right and given that there is no
character for the numeral zero. So I guess 2003 would be written
U+10123 (aegean number two thousand) followed by U+10109 (aegean
number three). Looking at the characters its a very regular system,
and lends itself to addition much more easily than Roman numerals but
like them, its hard(er) to do multiplication).

See http://www.unicode.org/pending/Aegean.pdf for a small amount of
context. Here is the original proposal:
http://www.unicode.org/pending/linearb/01149-n2327-aegean.pdf

Some more documentation on Aegean is in section 7 (aegean scripts) of
Daniels and Bright "the worlds' writing systems" pp 125-133. But
nothing on the numbers.

YFT> Do you have any books or print material show that it use this list of 
YFT> characters in an order list as the id?

Its possible that these numbers were only used for weights and
measures, not in numbering lists (based on the characters 10137-1013F)



-- 
 Chris                            mailto:chris@w3.org
Received on Thursday, 20 March 2003 04:08:01 GMT

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