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RE: Aural Style Sheets

From: Hawryluk, Zoltan <Zoltan.Hawryluk@attcanada.com>
Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 10:36:18 -0500 (EST)
Message-ID: <3D7C088D6CCFD31190A5009027D30E910C2C504A@torex004.att-intra.com>
To: "'somnium@freeuk.com'" <somnium@freeuk.com>, www-style@w3.org



I remember IBM having a solution for this.   It was some sort of thing built
on top of Internet Explorer if I do remember.  I never used it though, and
don't know if it uses Aural CSS.  

You are right ... it is sad that there is no implementation in the common
browsers.  Not only would it be great for the blind (which would be
excellent reason in and of itself), but would be great to get a computer to
read a web page while the user is doing other things, like sitting back in
his or her living room having a brandy.  :-)

Z.

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Mr bgthr gdhrynr [mailto:somnium@freeuk.com]
> Sent: Saturday, February 08, 2003 6:08 AM
> To: www-style@w3.org
> Subject: Re: Aural Style Sheets
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> > You could write one; it really should not be that hard....
> 
> quite true. I could write one. then the web would have its 
> first aural 
> style sheet enabled webpage.
> 
> > > Where does one get a suitable browser ?
> > 
> http://www.cs.cornell.edu/Info/People/raman/emacspeak/emacspeak.html -
> - Google
> > is your friend.
> 
> Ahh. What about the other 80% of people (sighted or otherwise) using 
> inferior operating systems like Windows and MacOSX ? Should 
> they write 
> their own aural browser ?
> 
> Seriously. I can remember TTS speech synthesis on all the 
> 8-bit micros (
> BBC b, ZXSpectrum, Amiga) -- are we really saying that 20 years on 
> there's no obvious way to have your webpage read aloud ?
> 
Received on Monday, 10 February 2003 10:41:59 GMT

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