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Re: Columns and other layouts

From: John Lewis <lewi0371@mrs.umn.edu>
Date: Fri, 25 Apr 2003 11:09:05 -0500
Message-ID: <122105729577.20030425110905@cda.mrs.umn.edu>
To: www-style@w3.org

Ben wrote on Friday, April 25, 2003 at 6:38:35 AM:

> As an example, consider CSS3's multicol module. I wasn't here for
> the discussions, but I've read the spec. How exactly do I achieve
> the kind of columnar layout used all over the web? ( E.g.
> http://hypothetical.co.uk/home.php) where content is grouped with
> columns rather than flowed. There is, as I understand it, no
> capability to introduce a break in the columnised content that
> leaves the lower portion of a column empty.

<http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-CSS2/tables.html> is one possible solution.

Multiple columns are another thing entirely. As the working draft
states, "This module describes multi-column layout in CSS. It builds
on the Box model module [...] and adds functionality to flow the
content of an element into multiple columns." I suppose it could be
more accurate, but what it's implying is that the ability to create
multiple columns already exists; what's being added is specifically
the ability to flow content of a single element into multiple columns.

If you read the the CSS2 recommendation, you'll see that traditional
table layouts were specified in CSS a long time ago (nearly five years
ago). You can also look at the CSS3 box model working draft.

A certain popular web browser continues to have pretty sparse CSS
support, and I wouldn't be surprised if tables still aren't supported.
That doesn't mean CSS is flawed; that means a certain browser doesn't
support CSS fully, in which case you'd be better off complaining to
the browser maker.

> My other concern relates to centering. I have a login box, I want it
> in the middle of the browser window. CSS does not address this
> issue, and previous attempts to gain clarity seem to have been
> brushed off with the argument that CSS is a document language not an
> interface one.

CSS *is* a document language, unless someone changed it while I wasn't
looking. At any rate, CSS can't fulfill your desire, because CSS can't
force anything. You can suggest that something look a certain way, but
users will have the ability to override author styles with user style
sheets or simply turn off author styles entirely. That's the way it
was designed.

-- 
John Lewis
Received on Friday, 25 April 2003 12:16:32 GMT

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