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Re: Preload for <section>

From: C. Bottelier <c.bottelier@ITsec.nl>
Date: Thu, 26 Sep 2002 22:02:04 +0200
Message-Id: <5.1.0.14.0.20020926214331.00a2b4a0@mail.ITsec.nl>
To: "Micho" <MichoKest@terra.es>
Cc: www-html@w3.org;, www-style@w3.org

At 06:38 PM 9/27/02, Micho wrote:
>If included as an optional attribute it wouldn't have an impact on 
>designers not using it, and it would still be useful.

How about for instance a screenreader, as sson as the
page, or a section of it, is completed, the screenreader
would start either reading the page from top, or jump forward or backward 
to read the changed (fully loaded)
section, or the user would not know that a section that
was skipped because it was not loaded completely.


>And, as it's use would be limited for sections that
>require to be loaded before their display, it
>wouldn't affect the whole page, it simply would help
>accomplishing a convincing design.

It would as an authors could do:

<section pre-load="">
<h1>Welcome to my site</h1>
<p>All my information would go here
because I dislike it that all the images,
embeded objects, applets, and so on apear
on by one
...
...
...
<section>


>At the moment, scripts and other stuff is used for
>some kind of 'pre-loading'

I thing every one agress that using scripts to either
hide content or to (and especially) generate content
is not done, because it poses to much issues, mainly
generating completly unaccessible website.s


>-the most usual has been seen in macromedia rollover
>images,- producing annoying effects when the rollover
>is made over unloaded images. This proposal could
>be code-clarifying, useful and not difficult at all
>to implement.

I wonder why flash isn't a W3 recommenbdation, and why
many people have much accessibility problems with flash.
For a good example you could try to visit the
http://www.mycom.nl/ website at a resolution of 640x480
because one needs larger fonts to read, or use it at a
high resolution and imagine somebody sees only 10% or
20% of what you see, try to enlarge the font, or figure
out what all those blurred texts say, or use Jaws, or
HPR to have the page read to you.

O.k. I know the last paragraph is off-topic but it
demmonstrates why some technologies (even for 'normal'
people) require much work to get it working the right
way.

Christian Bottelier
Received on Thursday, 26 September 2002 15:55:14 GMT

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