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Re: Selector specificity for the more unusual selector types

From: Ian Hickson <ian@hixie.ch>
Date: Sat, 25 May 2002 16:43:37 +0100
Message-ID: <3CEFB129.9070205@hixie.ch>
To: Liorean <Liorean@user.bip.net>
CC: www-style@w3.org
Liorean wrote:
> 
> I've got a small wondering about the specificity of some selectors, 
> namely the attribute selectors [class~="blah"] and [id="blah"], since 
> those are, at least in what element they affect equal to the .blah and 
> #blah selectors. Are all attribute selectors of the same specificity, or 
> does the specificity differ depending on what attribute you look at? If 
> it's equal for all attribute selectors, is there any way to raise the 
> specificity of [id="blah"] to that of #blah?

CSS2, 5.9:6:

# ID selectors have a higher precedence than attribute selectors. For example,
# in HTML, the selector #p123 is more specific than [ID=p123] in terms of the
# cascade.


> #blah2 #blah             { /* Specificity 2,0,0 */
>                          color: blue;
>                          }
> 
> #blah                    { /* Specificity 1,0,0 */
>                          color: red;
>                          }
> 
> [id="blah2"] [id="blah"] { /* Specificity 0,2,0 or 2,0,0? */
>                          color: green;
>                          }

0,2,0


> 
> [id="blah"]              { /* Specificity 0,1,0 or 1,0,0? */
>                          color: yellow;
>                          }
> 

0,1,0


> [id="blah2"] [id="blah"] { /* Specificity ? (Does this overrule the next 
> rule?)*/
>                          color: maroon !important;
>                          }

0,2,0, so yes, it overrides the following rule.


> 
> [id="blah"]              { /* Specificity ? */
>                          color: olive !important;
>                          }

0,1,0


> <div id="blah2">
>   <div id="blah">
>     content
>   </div>
> </div>
> 
> Will "content" take the colour maroon or olive?

maroon.

-- 
Ian Hickson
``The inability of a user agent to implement part of this specification due to
the limitations of a particular device (e.g., non interactive user agents will
probably not implement dynamic pseudo-classes because they make no sense
without interactivity) does not imply non-conformance.'' -- Selectors, Sec13
Received on Saturday, 25 May 2002 11:43:42 GMT

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