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FW: RE: [humanmarkup] Syntax

From: Manos Batsis <m.batsis@bsnet.gr>
Date: Thu, 1 Mar 2001 16:38:42 +0200
Message-ID: <D1E4335E90D4D311A99400D0B709A123448AA2@EMAIL_SRV>
To: "'www-style@w3.org'" <www-style@w3.org>


Below I have pasted two postings from humanmarkup: One from me and one from
Sean. Although css extensions is what may be of interest to you (and me at
this point), I have left the postings complete for you to understand a
bigger subject.
Please do provide some comments. Thanks for reading this far...

Kindest regards,
Manos

PS: JIC you might want to check the thread or even the whole discussion...
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/humanmarkup/messages




-----Original Message-----
From: Manos Batsis 
Sent: Thursday, March 01, 2001 12:52 PM
To: 'humanmarkup@yahoogroups.com'
Subject: Syntax



We still haven't decided the base syntax. To be able to use it within other
vocabularies and without having any problems with agents, inline  HumanML is
out of the question. Mixing vocabularies will make it messy, while agent
behavior may be unpredictable.
Personally I would like something like the Dublin Core approach. The
difference is, we want to link metadata not to the whole document but to
parts of it.
So, if emotions have percentage values and gestures have "attitude" we
should have something like this:

<rdf:Description
rdf:about="www.humanmarkup.org/manosTalksAgainDamnIt.htm#grrrrrrrrrrr">
  <huml:emotions>
     <huml:anger>100</huml:anger>
     <huml:dispair>30</huml:dispair>
     <huml:fear>-20</huml:fear>
  </huml:emotions>
  <huml:gestures>
     <huml:raiseHands>Berserk</huml:raiseHands>
  </huml:gestures>
</rdf:Description>


The problems are,  1st)this is my first RDF, 2) anyone care to say how will
metadata be linked to document parts? My "rdf:about" wont work for us and
3)too fluent.

Yup, this is too fluent for mobile devices. Another idea is css extensions.
Hey I can hear you laughing there stop it. Really, we can build css
extensions for "css mobile profile" (based on css2 I think, I'm sure Sean
knows these stuff better than me).
The renderer should know how to use them of course... but they will serve
well for lightweight scenarios:

.something{
feeling:angry(very) afraid(little);
}

Yup, IE filter syntax.
I think css can be used for this and as you can see, I have even disposed
percentage values because they need extra cpu strength. These values can be
mapped to percentage values if we want to.

But to make something really applicable, IMHO, we need RDF and I don't even
know if my markup above is (somewhat) right... Help?

Regards,
Manos


-----Original Message-----
From: Sean B. Palmer [mailto:sean@mysterylights.com]
Sent: Thursday, March 01, 2001 4:18 PM
To: humanmarkup@yahoogroups.com
Cc: Manos M. Batsis
Subject: Re: [humanmarkup] Syntax


> I see you haven't commented on the css thingie... You where the
> only one I expected comments from on this?

Just getting around to it! Here you go:-

[[[
> Really, we can build css extensions for "css mobile profile"
> (based on css2 I think, I'm sure Sean knows these stuff
> better than me).

Hmm, I'm not sure that you can build proprietery styling extensions
onto CSS3, even though it is modularized... it's not like XHTML
modularization. CSS is a rendering language - pure presentation, so
you can use it to style semantics, but *not* process semantics, or
(horror of all horrors) add to those semantics... unless you're just
basing it on the CSS syntax.

> .something{
> feeling:angry(very) afraid(little);
> }

What you're looking for is:-

     .angry { background-color: "red"; color: "black";
          font-weight: bold; font-size: 2em; }

You can't go putting semantics such as HuML in a presentation
langauge. However, you *could* use XSLT to convert all elements of a
certain class to their HuML equivalents. It would also be O.K. to map
from a HuML hint to it's CSS style. For example:-

     .something{ feeling:angry(very) afraid(little); }

maps to:-

     .something { background-color: "red"; color: "black"; }

But CSS transformations? You'd have to have an HuML file with all the
data, and then use XSLT to convert that into CSS (XSLT can output
plain text). Could be a good idea actually.
]]]

--
Kindest Regards,
Sean B. Palmer
@prefix : <http://webns.net/roughterms/> .
:Sean :hasHomepage <http://infomesh.net/sbp/> .
Received on Thursday, 1 March 2001 09:38:32 GMT

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