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RE: HTML <link rel="stylesheet"> underspecified with multiple languages

From: Manos Batsis <m.batsis@bsnet.gr>
Date: Tue, 26 Jun 2001 19:03:54 +0300
Message-ID: <A35E2040C17F0C48B941B8F4D0DF122908E2B7@ermhs.Athens.BrokerSystems.gr>
To: "Jeffrey Yasskin" <jyasskin@appcomp.com>, <ian@hixie.ch>
Cc: <www-style@w3.org>


> -----Original Message-----
> From: Jeffrey Yasskin [mailto:jyasskin@appcomp.com]

> You're suggesting that XSLT be processed before CSS. What 
> about JSSS or XYZ
> or some other stylesheet language? Either every possible 
> stylesheet language
> has to be included in the spec, or the spec has to define 
> some mechanism to
> choose between languages it hasn't heard of yet.


Nope, I was suggesting that the css could be used by the xslt's result
tree (if that had a <link rel...> ) if that was the developer's purpose,
since I don't really see any reason of having two PIs pointing at a css
and an xslt at the same document, unless there is some kind of mechanism
for choosing the appropriate one.

> > I see. Yes a priority attr may be a good idea - but only if 
> > you know the
> > Agent is capable of processing the stylesheet you 
> prioritised and even
> > in today's PC based internet, it's impossible. 
> > Instead of explicitly giving a priority, wouldn't it be better to be
> > able to program a flow (for example XSLT or CSS or even the old XSL
> > draft implemented inIE5) based on an attribute that 
> provides more info
> > (such as the 'media'?
> > 
> 
> The priority attr would simply prioritize the stylesheets a 
> UA could handle.
> In the following case:
> <?xml-stylesheet type="text/css" href="style.css" priority="1"?>
> <?xml-stylesheet type="text/abcd" href="style.abcd" priority="2"?>
> <?xml-stylesheet type="text/xml" href="style.xslt" priority="3"?>
> A UA that didn't understand ABCD would process the CSS and 
> then the XSLT.

Although that sequence is not really logical or useful (in my tired mind
at least) I do get your point. This may well be a simple but effective
mechanism.

> > How hard is it to implement a 'navigator' attribute using the DOM? I
> > think it's about time...
> 
> My turn not to get it. What would a navigator attribute do?
> 


Sorry for not being clear. I just thought that since W3C has gone
through all this work of building specifications such as css media
queries and DOM, how come I cannot write something like:

?xml-stylesheet href="a.xslt" navigator="IE" ?>
OR
?xml-stylesheet href="b.xslt" navigator="DOM2" ?>
OR
?xml-stylesheet href="c.xslt" navigator="text" ?>

OR whatever, meaning that we should had ways of quering about agent
capabilities already, in more detail than (the generalised as a consept)
css media queries allow.

Kindest regards,

Manos
Received on Tuesday, 26 June 2001 12:05:14 GMT

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