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Re: question

From: L. David Baron <dbaron@fas.harvard.edu>
Date: Thu, 25 May 2000 12:35:23 -0400 (EDT)
To: "'www-style@w3.org'" <www-style@w3.org>
cc: David King <david.king@perfectorder.com>, Okker Tuja W Civ AFSAC/ITD <Tuja.Okker@wpafb.af.mil>
Message-ID: <Pine.OSF.4.10.10005251233120.7499-100000@is04.fas.harvard.edu>

> Okker Tuja W Civ AFSAC/ITD wrote:
> > 
> > I have a question regarding CSS1...i have my screen set at 800x600
> > and when i use the <style> tags to code with it looks great on my
> > screen...but when i change the screen to either higher or lower, my
> > page does not seem to compensate for the screen change.  is there
> > something i can do about that so that if people view web pages at
> > different pixels they will see the exact same thing as using 800x600?
> > does this make any sense?  :)  i also use netscape 4.7 .. thank you for
> > the help...

The problem is most likely that you're mixing units in ways that don't
work.  For example, if you use px in one place, and percentages in
another, the effect will differ depending on the width of the browser
window.  Similarly, if you mix pixels and physical units (pt, in, cm,
etc.), you will see major changes when you change logical resolution.
(Changing physical resolution does not change the logical resolution on
any operating system I know of, although it should.)  If you mix units
that depend on the font size (em, ex) with percentages, you might see
strange things with font size changes or changes in document width.
There are of course many good ways to mix percentages and em, but
assuming that 50% + 20em = 100% is not one of them.

What should help is to think through your use of lengths, perhaps with
pencil and paper, rather than figuring out what different lengths do on
your screen.  Try to use lengths that depend on the font size (em) or
the width of the document (percentages), as appropriate.

If this doesn't help, it would probably be better to:
 * post a message in a more appropriate forum, such as
   comp.infosystems.www.authoring.stylesheets
 * include details of the problem

On Thu, 25 May 2000 08:25:33 -0400, "David King"
(david.king@perfectorder.com) wrote:
> 
> Without seeing the problem and the code myself, I would say it's a
> Netscape issue.  Netscape 4.x is absolutely horrible and the bane of my
> web developing existence at the moment.  Try IE and see if your problem
> occurs.  If it doesn't, you know you have a Netscape issue.

While Netscape 4.x does have CSS bugs, it's probably not a Netscape
issue (see above).

I also think Netscape 4.x isn't as buggy as many people think.  I've
found that many CSS bugs people report in Netscape are really cases
where MSIE is too lenient with incorrect CSS.  If it works in IE, and
doesn't work in Netscape, that doesn't mean it is *supposed* to work
according to the CSS specs.  There are existing CSS checking tools such
as [1] and [2] that can be helpful (and HTML validators are always good
too).

-David

[1] http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/
[2] http://www.htmlhelp.com/tools/csscheck/

L. David Baron    Sophomore, Harvard (Physics)    dbaron@fas.harvard.edu
Links, SatPix, CSS, etc.     <URL: http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~dbaron/ >
WSP CSS AC                      <URL: http://www.webstandards.org/css/ >
Received on Thursday, 25 May 2000 12:35:38 GMT

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