W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-style@w3.org > December 2000

Your Display or Mine?

From: Jimi Thompson <jthompson@link.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2000 09:01:30 -0600
Message-ID: <3A421B4A.2770E1F@link.com>
To: www-style@w3.org
I've been lurking a bit and felt the need to chip in :)

You folks are all missing one major important point here - 
Colors are dependent on the monitor in question.  

What looks (at least to me) perfectly wonderful on my display may be
totally and completely hideous on yours.  That nice shade of lemon
yellow that I used as a highlight may look more like rotting pumpkin to
you.  It would be nice to allow the users to adjust this, at least a
bit. It is however not something I have to have or die as a developer.

I usually handle this via Javascript.  I have some preset color schemes
one of which should be visible and tolerable to 90%+ of the target
audience.  Other times its just not worth the effort.

Thanks for listening,

Jimi 





Rowland Shaw wrote:
> 
> This I like -- whilst on the subject of colours, I'd like to be able to do
> things like creating my own names, so I can do:
> div .blah { border-color: blah; }
> h2 .blah { background-color: blah; }
> .blah { color: blah; }
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Ian Brockbank [mailto:i.brockbank@indigovision.com]
> Sent: 18 December 2000 09:04
> To: www-style@w3.org
> Subject: RE: Relative colors in CSS?
> 
> miki.wiik@linuxsupport.to wrote:
> 
> > Do existing CSS standards, or ones being planned, include a
> > way to define colors relatively to their parents?
> >
> > Example:
> >
> > BODY {color : #CCCC99}
> >
> > P {color : darker}
> >
> > [snip]
> >
> > A suggestion for different values:
> > Brighter, decreases all RGB values by, say 5%.
> > Darker, increases all RGB values by 5%.
> > +red, increase Red value by 5%.
> > -red, decrease Red value by 5%
> > ++ by 10%.
> > +++ by 15%...
> > and combinations (or shorthand) +red --green +++blue
> 
> This sounds a nice idea.  How about + and - for colours moving to the
> next in the "safe" collection - ie +-#33?  Or is that too coarse?
> 
> Ian
> --
> IndigoVision Ltd                 http://www.indigovision.com/
> The Edinburgh Technopole,  Bush  Loan,  Edinburgh,  EH26  0PJ
> Tel: [+44] (0)131 475 7200         Fax: [+44] (0)131 475 7201
> Personal: ian@scottishdance.net  http://www.scottishdance.net
>         Feed the world: http://www.thehungersite.com/
> 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: miki.wiik@linuxsupport.to [mailto:miki.wiik@linuxsupport.to]
> > Sent: 16 December 2000 21:28
> > To: w3.org mailing Style
> > Subject: Relative colors in CSS?
> >
> >
> > Hi.
> >
> > Do existing CSS standards, or ones being planned, include a
> > way to define colors relatively to their parents?
> >
> > Example:
> >
> > BODY {color : #CCCC99}
> >
> > P {color : darker}
> >
> > The reason I'm looking for this sort of solution is that
> > quite often when designing pages I use a set of colors that
> > are more or less variations of the same basic color. The
> > background is a light tone, the following layer (div) a bit
> > darker, the following even darker plus a bit more red, etc.
> >
> > Since almost all other values in CSS can be either absolute
> > or relative (to their parent), it seems only natural that
> > colors would also.
> >
> > A suggestion for different values:
> > Brighter, decreases all RGB values by, say 5%.
> > Darker, increases all RGB values by 5%.
> > +red, increase Red value by 5%.
> > -red, decrease Red value by 5%
> > ++ by 10%.
> > +++ by 15%...
> > and combinations (or shorthand) +red --green +++blue
> >
> > Having a way to define relative colors would IMO improve
> > scalability (the author would only have to define one
> > starting colour, that could easily be replaced by User
> > stylesheets) and thus increase overall flexibility.
> >
> > Regards, Miki Wiik
> >
> > <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
> > <HTML><HEAD>
> > <META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
> > <META content="MSHTML 5.50.4522.1800" name=GENERATOR>
> > <STYLE></STYLE>
> > </HEAD>
> > <BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
> > <DIV>Hi.</DIV>
> > <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> > <DIV>Do existing CSS standards, or ones being planned,
> > include a way to define
> > colors relatively to their parents? </DIV>
> > <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> > <DIV>Example:</DIV>
> > <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> > <DIV>BODY {color : #CCCC99}</DIV>
> > <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> > <DIV>P {color : darker}</DIV>
> > <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> > <DIV>The reason I'm looking for this sort of solution is that
> > quite often when
> > designing pages I use a set of colors that are more or less
> > variations of the
> > same basic color.&nbsp;The background is a light tone, the
> > following layer
> > (div)&nbsp;a bit darker, the following even darker plus a bit
> > more red, etc.
> > </DIV>
> > <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> > <DIV>Since almost all other values in CSS can be either
> > absolute or relative (to
> > their parent), it seems only natural that colors would also. </DIV>
> > <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> > <DIV>A&nbsp;suggestion for&nbsp;different values: </DIV>
> > <DIV>Brighter, decreases all RGB values by, say 5%. </DIV>
> > <DIV>Darker, increases all RGB values by 5%. </DIV>
> > <DIV>+red, increase Red value by 5%. </DIV>
> > <DIV>-red, decrease Red value by 5%</DIV>
> > <DIV>++ by 10%. </DIV>
> > <DIV>+++ by 15%... </DIV>
> > <DIV>and combinations (or shorthand)&nbsp;+red --green +++blue</DIV>
> > <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> > <DIV>Having a way to define relative colors would IMO improve
> > scalability (the
> > author would only have to define one starting colour, that
> > could easily be
> > replaced by User stylesheets) and thus increase overall
> > flexibility.</DIV>
> > <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> > <DIV>Regards, Miki Wiik</DIV>
> > <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV></BODY></HTML>
> >
Received on Thursday, 21 December 2000 10:02:03 GMT

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