W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-style@w3.org > March 1999

Re: a simple question

From: Mike Meyer <mwm@phone.net>
Date: Wed, 10 Mar 1999 09:32:45 -0800 (PST)
To: gordon <gordon@quartz.gly.fsu.edu>
cc: "Braden N. McDaniel" <braden@endoframe.com>, Ian Hickson <py8ieh=www-style@bath.ac.uk>, George Lund <george@lundboox.demon.co.uk>, www-style@w3.org
Message-ID: <Pine.BSF.4.05.9903100926090.330-100000@guru.phone.net>
On Wed, 10 Mar 1999, gordon wrote:

> From: gordon <gordon@quartz.gly.fsu.edu>
>
> It's odd that Hakon hasn't jumped in to lecture on the benefits of the
> cascade.  It's worrisome to think that those interested in shaping and
> implementing the CSS specification suffer from the delusion that a web-page
> author is, by default, also a design expert.  I'm thankful for the cascade
> every time that the typical "pimp's wardrobe" web site rears its ugly head
> in front of me!  A nice addition to the specification would be a wildcard
> with which to override [especially unknown] pseudo-class selectors.

I find that the typical "pimp's wardrobe" site becomes painfull - if
not unreadable - with the relatively minor changes users can make
today. Running at high resolutions or with narrower windows, for
instance.  It's unrealistic to expect pages from those authors to
survive something that gives the users as much control as CSS. But
those authors won't be any worse off than they are today. They'll
thoughtlessly design for the default settings of the big two, the vast
majority of browsers won't change those settings, and the minority of
us who do - or use a "show" browser - will curse the authors as
idiots. Which is pretty much what happens today.

	<mike
Received on Wednesday, 10 March 1999 12:32:49 GMT

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