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Re: background-position and other sundry css clarifications

From: Gordon Blackstock <gordon@quartz.gly.fsu.edu>
Date: Sat, 10 May 1997 09:09:47 -0700
Message-Id: <199705101610.QAA11984@quartz.gly.fsu.edu>
To: "David Perrell" <davidp@earthlink.net>, "Douglas Rand" <drand@sgi.com>, <www-style@w3.org>


----------
> From: David Perrell <davidp@earthlink.net>
> To: Douglas Rand <drand@sgi.com>; www-style@w3.org
> Subject: Re: background-position and other sundry css clarifications
> Date: Friday, May 09, 1997 10:08 PM
> 
<snip>
>  
> > A last clarification.  Each element can be addressed with a CSS
> > property.  Is there an implicit element for the text within a block, 
> or
> > is it simply assumed that you can never set non-inherited properties
> for
> > that text without using SPAN?
> 
> I don't understand the question. Each element has many properties,
> including text properties and font properties.
> 
> David Perrell
> 

The first part of the question is a bit confusing. If you meant 'are there
implicit properties for the text within a block,' then the answer is yes.
Starting with the BODY block and including the DIV block inheritance
applies. IE and NC also allow, what has already been pointed out to me as
violations of strict DTD usage <g>, other block-level elements to be
included within each other where inheritance rules apply.

Yes, there is a way to set both inherited and non-inherited properties
without using SPAN. If, for example, you have a rule for the P element and
need to 'enhance' it in a single instance, then you can use this structure:

<P STYLE="[declaration list]"> . 
SPAN is generally reserved for small sections of text, i.e., highlighting
of a phrase or a sentence. 

Gordon Blackstock
Received on Saturday, 10 May 1997 12:10:36 GMT

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