W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-style@w3.org > February 1997

RE: Dealing with form elements...

From: Chris Wilson (PSD) <cwilso@MICROSOFT.com>
Date: Tue, 4 Feb 1997 12:15:41 -0800
Message-ID: <c=US%a=_%p=msft%l=RED-76-MSG-970204201541Z-77815@INET-03-IMC.itg.microsoft.com>
To: "'wmperry@aventail.com'" <wmperry@aventail.com>
Cc: "'W3C Style Mailing List'" <www-style@w3.org>
But a pseudoclass extension would be equally beyond the scope of CSS1.
And by the way - answer YOUR phone.  :^)

I understand your approach in Emacs-W3 - an excellent one - but my point
was that exposure of declarative features would have to be in CSS, not
DSSSL (or some subset or relative) or it would be outside the abilities
of those systems that do not support DSSSL directly.

	-Chris
Chris Wilson
cwilso@microsoft.com
-[-

>-----Original Message-----
>From:	William M. Perry [SMTP:wmperry@aventail.com]
>Sent:	Tuesday, February 04, 1997 11:56 AM
>To:	Chris Wilson (PSD)
>Cc:	'W3C Style Mailing List'
>Subject:	RE: Dealing with form elements...
>
>Chris Wilson writes:
>>I don't see exactly why this is beyond the realm of CSS (obviously beyond
>>CSS1, but not necessarily CSS2, e.g.).  It's purely a declarative
>>mechanism, and pretty easy to drop into both the syntax and (in our case
>>at least) the implementation.  
>
>  another tuesday brain misfire chris.  I said _CSS1_. :) And by the way -
>answer your phone. :)
>
>>Forcing DSSSL on content authors and Web tool implementers who are
>>resistant even to the simplicity of CSS is just probably not going to
>>work.
>
>  Hence the throwing CSS through a converter.  I meant this to mean
>internally Emacs-W3 would convert CSS declarations into a DSSSL equivalent.
>The user and the author wouldn't have to know the difference between DSSSL
>and a hole in the wall.
>
>-Bill P.
>
Received on Tuesday, 4 February 1997 15:15:09 GMT

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