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Re: DSSSL [drop caps]

From: <lee@sq.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Apr 97 22:43:18 EDT
Message-Id: <9704230243.AA26810@sqrex.sq.com>
To: www-style@w3.org
> lee@sq.com wrote:
> > David Perrell" <davidp@earthlink.net> wrote:
> > > A CSS floated SPAN should make drop caps easy.
> > 
> > No, because you can't get the size right in CSS...
> 
> Theoretically you can as long as the specified font is available.

Only on platforms that do no correction for screen resolution.
For example, if you're using X Windows on a 150 dpi screen and I'm
using a Mac with a 72 dpi screen, your 30 pt font might be 100 pixels high,
and ine might be 50 pixels high...  However, if you use em for everything,
this may not matter too much.

In most grphic design work, misaligned by a little ight as well read
<emph>looks wrong</emph> instead...

> > The best way to do drop caps is to have a built-in property, e.g.
> > P { initial-letter: @drop-cap(lines: 3 font: xxx) }
> 
> Or perhaps a more general drop-lines property?
> 
>    P:first-letter { drop-lines: 3}

Yes, that's too.

> 3. compute a new default font-size for the floated element
>    such that the cap height equals (parent's cap height)
>    + (drop-lines * parent's line-height)

Actually
     such that the cap height equals (parent's cap height)
     + ((drop-lines - 1) * parent's line-height)

> 6. adjust the default line-height of the float to coincide with
>    the bottom of the lowest glyph (in the case of cap letters,
>    this should allow the line following line [drop-lines + 1]
>    in the parent to begin at the left margin, avoiding the 'hole'
>    under the drop cap that would otherwise occur)
bottom should be baseliine here I think...

> Note that a SPAN with drop-lines could be applied to any number of
> characters.
Yes.

> The most important function of any drop cap property is to align
> baselines. Don't force other properties into a specific stylistic
> convention.
I agree.

Lee
Received on Tuesday, 22 April 1997 22:43:24 GMT

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