W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-style@w3.org > September 1995

Re: A nit and an addition for the current draft

From: Bert Bos <bert@let.rug.nl>
Date: Mon, 18 Sep 1995 15:54:54 +0200 (METDST)
Message-Id: <199509181354.AA240062493@freya.let.rug.nl>
To: www-style@w3.org
Bill Perry writes:
 |Bert Bos writes:
 |> Steve Grimm writes:
 |> 
 |>  |The nit: The text-background attribute has an ambiguous value type.
 |>  |
 |>  |<style>
 |>  |	body: text-background="bluegreen"
 |>  |</style>
 |>  |
 |>  |There's no way for a parser to know if "bluegreen" is a relative URL or a
 |>  |color name.  Perhaps there should be two attributes for background, with a
 |>  |defined order of precedence between them.
 |> 
 |> The intention is that color names are entered as keywords without
 |> quotes. The reasoning behind this is, that, presumably, the number of
 |> color names is small, so they can be entered in the parser's hash table.
 |
 |  That seems a particularly poor way to differentiate between the two.  If
 |a user wants 'readability' they might very well choose to write everything
 |like:
 |
 |body: text-background="red" text-foreground="white" font-style="demi-bold"
 |
 |  Ideally, this should `just work right' from the users perspective.

Why would quotes be `just right'?

The first will be a (relative) URL's and so that at least works, but
only if the style designer has provided a definition for "red" on his
server.

The other two won't work, because a string is not a valid data type
for these properties. Are you suggesting that strings should be
acceptable anywhere a keyword is expected? This may cause confusion
for the places where the string is to be interpreted as a URL.

Or do you want separate properties for URL's, such as
`text-background' vs `text-background-url'? The problem is that this
may not be very intuitive either. For example:

  LI: text-background-url = "snowflake"
  (LI) P: text-background = red

  OL: text-background = red
  (OL) P: text-background-url = "snowflake"

A P inside an LI inherits a background pattern, but it is overridden
with a background color. A P inside an OL inherits a background color,
but it is overridden with a background pattern.

Question: given the four rules above what happens to a P that is
inside an LI inside an OL?


Bert
-- 
                          Bert Bos                      Alfa-informatica
                 <bert@let.rug.nl>           Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
    <http://www.let.rug.nl/~bert/>     Postbus 716, NL-9700 AS GRONINGEN
Received on Monday, 18 September 1995 09:54:57 GMT

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