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RE: What is truth anyways? was: [...]

From: Graham Klyne <GK@ninebynine.org>
Date: Wed, 12 Jun 2002 18:07:52 +0100
Message-Id: <5.1.0.14.2.20020612180041.038db010@joy.songbird.com>
To: Peter Crowther <peter.crowther@networkinference.com>
Cc: "'Jim Hendler'" <hendler@cs.umd.edu>, www-rdf-logic@w3.org

At 11:52 AM 6/12/02 +0100, Peter Crowther wrote:
>1) Bilateral communications rather than peer-to-peer, allowing effective
>communication between producer and consumer of specification;
>
>2) Well-understood problem domains, such as finance, giving a higer base of
>common understanding to start with;
>
>3) Restricted problem domains, such as a credit card application, giving a
>limited scope for any such communication;
>
>4) Past experience of similar problems, giving a history of known solutions;
>
>5) Shared language between producer and consumer of specification;
>
>6) Limited scope of implementation, for example a single banking system
>communicating with a central card issuer system;
>
>7) Limited variation of environment, for example a credit card system that
>deploys particular card swipe hardware and software.
>
>All of these simplifying factors were present in your example.  None of
>these simplifying factors are present on the semantic web.  I consider the
>comparison between the two cases to be specious for that reason.

But it is exactly (2)-(5) that I expect to see in the near-term semantic web.

More specifically, my perception is that RDF provides a common framework 
for integrating a range of applications with well-understood problem 
domains -- for example, that is what I see in the oft-quoted Scientific 
American article:  the various subsystems already exist today and are well 
understood but don't have the means to share the information they use in 
common.

Of course there are more possibilities in the longer-term, but I perceive 
most of those are still research topics.

#g


-------------------
Graham Klyne
<GK@NineByNine.org>
Received on Wednesday, 12 June 2002 13:07:33 GMT

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