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RE: URI: Name or Network Location?

From: Hammond, Tony (ELSLON) <T.Hammond@elsevier.com>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2004 15:38:26 -0000
Message-ID: <54A600C436EA694581B93E4BD4D4788A06B73F40@elslonexc004.eslo.co.uk>
To: 'Phil Dawes' <pdawes@users.sourceforge.net>, Patrick Stickler <patrick.stickler@nokia.com>
Cc: ext Sandro Hawke <sandro@w3.org>, www-rdf-interest@w3.org, "Thomas B. Passin" <tpassin@comcast.net>, ext Jeremy Carroll <jjc@hplb.hpl.hp.com>

> It seems to me
> that the most obvious way of addressing this is to use a URI to denote
> the thing (i.e. a name) and a seperate way of talking about the
> numerous ways of locating information about it.

Hence INFO, see <http://info-uri.info/> ...

Tony


> -----Original Message-----
> From: www-rdf-interest-request@w3.org
> [mailto:www-rdf-interest-request@w3.org]On Behalf Of Phil Dawes
> Sent: 22 January 2004 15:23
> To: Patrick Stickler
> Cc: ext Sandro Hawke; www-rdf-interest@w3.org; Thomas B. Passin; ext
> Jeremy Carroll
> Subject: Re: URI: Name or Network Location?
> 
> 
> 
> Hi Patrick,
> 
> Patrick Stickler writes: 
>  > 
>  > Per your view, most URIs do not denote web pages, images,
>  > video streams, services, etc. but all denote "locations" and
>  > if we ever want to describe all those web-accessible resources,
>  > we need an entirely different set of URIs for them if we wish
>  > to talk about them.
>  > 
> 
> But surely the only reason this argument has weight is because there
> is usually only 1 way of retrieving that web resource* - i.e. HTTP. 
> Thus it becomes an attractive choice for naming it.
> 
> If the web hadn't turned out the way it has, and there were lots of
> protocols vying on equal footing for supremacy, then the 'it's a name'
> argument wouldn't seem so obvious. We would, as you say, probably have
> a way of talking about the web resource itself, and a seperate way of
> talking about the numerous ways of locating it.
> 
> The problem now is that we are attempting to use HTTP URIs to describe
> abstract concepts and physical objects, and so the 'it's a name'
> argument for HTTP URIs is suddenly non-obvious again. It seems to me
> that the most obvious way of addressing this is to use a URI to denote
> the thing (i.e. a name) and a seperate way of talking about the
> numerous ways of locating information about it.
> 
> Cheers,
> 
> Phil
> 
> * or the representation of that resource
> 
Received on Thursday, 22 January 2004 10:46:14 GMT

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