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Re: RDF Schema Validator - Validate RDF triples

From: Seth Ladd <seth@brivo.net>
Date: Mon, 28 Apr 2003 09:56:41 -0400
Message-ID: <3EAD3319.6070602@brivo.net>
To: www-rdf-interest@w3.org


> The validator should write out:
> "resource X has object Y defined as "creator" but Y is not of required
> range mm:Artist"
> "resource X is not of any known class"

I don't believe that RDFS prescribes correctness in the way you want it to.

(excuse the sloppy rdf/xml)

RDFS adds information to your model.  So when you say

<mb:Song rdf:about="xxx">
   <dc:creator rdf:resource="yyy"/>
</mb:Song>

and you apply your RDFS of:

<rdfs:Property rdf:about="dc:creator">
   <rdfs:range rdf:resource="mb:Artist"/>
</rdfs:Property>

You (or your rdf processor) then know that the resource "yyy" is an Artist.

I'm not sure it's correct to say that a RDFS can validate in the way you
want.  It's not XML Schema, for instance.  It has a different purpose.
I was confused, too, because it also uses the word Schema.

This is actually a good thing, though:

Say you want to ask "Show me all the mb:Artist's".  In the original rdf,
there is no triple that states a resource if of type mb:Artist.  But...

Because RDFS says that dc:creator's are mb:Artists, and "yyy" is a
dc:creator, your query will return "yyy" as an mb:Artist (even though
it's not specified anywhere!).

So, RDFS's purpose is help describe RDF resources and properties.  It's
not really around to Validate (in the sense that I think you want it to).

I hope that helps some,
Seth
Received on Monday, 28 April 2003 09:57:22 GMT

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