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Re: Mirroring Unicode symbols in Arabian

From: Azzeddine LAZREK Azzeddine LAZREK <lazrek@uca.ma>
Date: Wed, 20 Feb 2013 20:41:38 +0000
Message-ID: <CAGaVOLeCxtzuwHEnr1+1xFtPnwJ-B-P_yDYSCi5PMrbMwkC5=Q@mail.gmail.com>
To: "Thomas E. Leathrum" <leathrum@jsu.edu>
Cc: Paul Topping <pault@dessci.com>, www-math@w3.org
Personally, I prefer that the Unicode name reflect a description of
character's presentation and never the semantic one.

In my opinion:  U00028 *LEFT* PARENTHESIS and U00029 *RIGHT *PARENTHESIS

not at all:  U00028 *OPEN*  PARENTHESIS and U00029 *CLOSE*  PARENTHESIS

Azzeddine


2013/2/20 Tom Leathrum <leathrum@jsu.edu>

> If I may interject here:
>
> Paul, I think Murray's point about semantics addresses your concern,
> because if there is a semantic difference between reversed symbols in LTR
> then they will be represented in different Unicode values.  Consider for
> example U+2282 "subset" and U+2283 "superset" -- the glyphs are
> mirror-images, and both are marked as mirror="Y" for RTL.  RTL would have
> the visual effect of swapping these two glyphs, but in fact their Unicode
> values wouldn't change because the semantics would still be the same --
> U+2282 would be semantically "subset" whether it is mirrored or not, and in
> RTL the glyph for it would look (to LTR readers) like a superset symbol.
>  Clear as mud?
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Paul Topping" <pault@dessci.com>
> To: "Murray Sargent" <murrays@exchange.microsoft.com>, "Khaled Hosny" <
> khaledhosny@eglug.org>
> Cc: "Neil Soiffer" <neils@dessci.com>, "Kent Karlsson" <
> kent.karlsson14@telia.com>, "David Carlisle" <davidc@nag.co.uk>, "Daniel
> Marques" <dani@wiris.com>, www-math@w3.org
> Sent: Wednesday, February 20, 2013 1:46:15 PM
> Subject: RE: Mirroring Unicode symbols in Arabian
>
> So this means that reversing a symbol to express a mathematical concept is
> unavailable to non-RTL text even though the fonts and the font rendering
> mechanism has the capability.
>
> Paul
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Murray Sargent [mailto:murrays@exchange.microsoft.com]
> > Sent: Wednesday, February 20, 2013 11:36 AM
> > To: Paul Topping; Khaled Hosny
> > Cc: Neil Soiffer; Kent Karlsson; David Carlisle; Daniel Marques; www-
> > math@w3.org
> > Subject: RE: Mirroring Unicode symbols in Arabian
> >
> > I meant that the codes for the mirrored integral, etc., are exactly the
> > same as the unmirrored symbols. The display software just mirrors them
> > in RTL math zones. If you use OpenType, you used the 'rtlm' feature or
> > shaping, as the characters warrant. This is the same thing as for
> > mirrored characters that have mirrored character counterparts. An open
> > paren is U+0028 whether it's mirrored or not.
> >
> > Murray
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Paul Topping [mailto:pault@dessci.com]
> > Sent: Wednesday, February 20, 2013 11:31 AM
> > To: Murray Sargent; Khaled Hosny
> > Cc: Neil Soiffer; Kent Karlsson; David Carlisle; Daniel Marques; www-
> > math@w3.org
> > Subject: RE: Mirroring Unicode symbols in Arabian
> >
> > Not sure how this answers my question.
> >
> > Paul
> >
> > > -----Original Message-----
> > > From: Murray Sargent [mailto:murrays@exchange.microsoft.com]
> > > Sent: Wednesday, February 20, 2013 11:24 AM
> > > To: Paul Topping; Khaled Hosny
> > > Cc: Neil Soiffer; Kent Karlsson; David Carlisle; Daniel Marques; www-
> > > math@w3.org
> > > Subject: RE: Mirroring Unicode symbols in Arabian
> > >
> > > Mirrored glyphs are a display feature, not a semantic one.
> > >
> > > Murray
> > >
> > > Paul Topping asked, "If access to these characters requires use of
> > > this OpenType feature, does it imply that such characters will not be
> > > accessible from applications that simply process Unicode text strings
> > > (eg, web browsers and most other apps)?"
>
>
>
Received on Wednesday, 20 February 2013 20:42:06 GMT

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