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RE: Arabic math

From: <lazrek@ucam.ac.ma>
Date: Sat, 1 Mar 2008 07:49:29 -0000 (WET)
Message-ID: <54279.196.217.150.21.1204357769.squirrel@web.ucam.ac.ma>
To: "Richard Ishida" <ishida@w3.org>
Cc: "'cj'" <cj@mb-soft.com>, www-math@w3.org

We agree.

However, despite all this, all systems WYSIWYG today, I tested, present a
problem composition of the numbers, particularly with Copy / Cut / Paste
and when positioning within a number.

Azzeddine

Le Ven 29 février 2008 11:36, Richard Ishida a écrit :
>

> Note that if you list out characters in Unicode in the order they appear
> in computer memory, you would see the following (read top to bottom, where
>  upper case represents Arabic letters):
>
> A
> R
> A
> B
> I
> C
>
>
> 1
> 2
> 3
> .
> 4
>
>
> T
> E
> X
> T
>
>
> This is also the order in which a simple phrase like that would normally
> be typed.
>
> When that is displayed, however, you see
>
>
> TXET 123.4 CIBARA
>
>
> This is achieved at run time, as characters are typed, using the Unicode
> bidirectional algorithm and the rendering software applying rules to the
> text to reorder.  The order of characters in memory remains unchanged.
> The
> position of the dot will change as you type and the system works out
> whether this is a sentence-final period or decimal point.  For more
> information see
> http://www.w3.org/International/articles/inline-bidi-markup/
>
>
> RI
>
>
> ============
> Richard Ishida
> Internationalization Lead
> W3C (World Wide Web Consortium)
>
>
> http://www.w3.org/International/
> http://rishida.net/blog/
> http://rishida.net/
>
>
>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: www-math-request@w3.org [mailto:www-math-request@w3.org] On Behalf
>>  Of cj
>> Sent: 26 February 2008 20:21
>> To: www-math@w3.org
>> Subject: Arabic math
>>
>>
>>
>> Your presentation on Arabic math notation is excellent.
>>
>>
>> However, I have one issue that I think is important, and I do not see
>> that you have addressed it there.
>>
>> It has to do with ltr and rtl presentation of Arabic numbers.  The most
>>  obvious example I have thought of is this sentence:
>>
>> The circumference of a circle is 3.1415926535 times the diameter.
>>
>>
>> If an Arabic writer translates that sentence into Arabic, the wording
>> begins flowing from right to left.  But if it is required that the value
>> of pi is presented left-to-right, then the writer would have to skip
>> ahead AN UNSPECIFIC AMOUNT OF SPACE in order to then write the value in
>> the space. That seems immensely illogical and inconvenient to me.  I
>> would think that all Arabic writers would necessarily write that
>> sentence, words and numbers, from right-to-left.  In other words, after
>> that writer writes the Arabic words for "circle is", he would next write
>> the 3 immediately to the left of it, then the punctuation (whether
>> decimal or comma) then the 1, etc.
>>
>> It is the only logical way where an Arabic writer would not have
>> problems in providing appropriate space for the number value.  When he is
>> done writing down the numeric value, with the final 5, at the left-hand
>> end of where he then was, he would simply and logically continue on with
>> the following words, "times the", continuing leftward.
>>
>> I realize that does not always seem to be done.  But it seems the
>> "logical"
>> way that schoolchildren are taught the circle circumference
>> relationship, doesn't it?
>>
>> Carl Johnson
>> (Nuclear Physicist)
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
> --
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>
>



-- 
Ce message a été vérifié par MailScanner
pour des virus ou des polluriels et rien de
suspect n'a été trouvé.
MailScanner remercie transtec pour son soutien.
Received on Saturday, 1 March 2008 07:49:46 GMT

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