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Re: Is it so hard to generate compliant software ?

From: Goessner / MecXpert <goessner@mecxpert.de>
Date: Mon, 24 Jun 2002 23:02:16 +0200
Message-ID: <003401c21bc2$7a90a3a0$fe78a8c0@alpha>
To: <www-math@w3.org>, <www-svg@w3.org>

hi william,

> > Here is an example using IE6, SvgViewer 3.0 and Mathplayer 1.0 beta 4.
> [snip]
> >   <object id="MathPlayer"
> > classid="clsid:32f66a20-7614-11d4-bd11-00104bd3f987"></object>
> >   <object id="AdobeSVG"
> > classid="clsid:78156a80-c6a1-4bbf-8e6a-3cd390eeb4e2"></object>
>
> How is one to remember these classid values?  :-)  ...  :-{

.. ask microsoft. this is their proprietary way to identify com-components /
activex-controls.

> This strikes me as unsound practice.  Why should content providers
> have to deal with them?

they have to, if they want to support activex controls .. or use the -
non-standard - <embed> element alternatively. but only, if the component
provider supports this, like adobe with their viewer, unlike design science
with their player.

> Do such methods conform to W3C WAI guidelines?

.. hmm .. :)

> In fact, why don't the <object> elements have mime type attributes
> that enable a user to configure his/her platform according to
> taste?

these unsatisfactory aspects were in fact a strong motivation to create the
'Universal MathML StyleSheet' (UMSS) as a workaround. see w3c's mathml web
page for this.

see also the parallel post in this thread, where david carlisle extended
that 'umss' to support svg also.

--
stefan goessner
Received on Monday, 24 June 2002 16:54:27 GMT

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