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Re: For review: 1 new and 3 updated articles about language declarations in HTML

From: Leif Halvard Silli <xn--mlform-iua@xn--mlform-iua.no>
Date: Fri, 2 Sep 2011 22:27:54 +0200
To: Richard Ishida <ishida@w3.org>, www International <www-international@w3.org>
Message-ID: <20110902222754541963.e24dad5b@xn--mlform-iua.no>
Leif Halvard Silli, Fri, 2 Sep 2011 22:08:15 +0200:
> 
> When it comes to HTML5:  The article is clearly not negative towards 
> use of dublin core: <meta name="dc.language" content="en">. I agree 
> that there can be good reasons to avoid http-equiv=COntent-Language 
> even in HTML4/XHTML1. As for HTML5, then it isn't really against 
> dc.language - it just says that it has not been registered.

Oh, I was wrong - judging from the source code of the draft - but not 
much else, the article disapproves of dc.languge:

<code><img src="/International/icons/dontcopy.png" alt="Do not use 
this" title="Do not use this" class="dontuse"> <meta name="dc.language" 
content="en"></code>

Perhaps, btw, you should ask the Dublin Core project before 
disapproving and before stating this:

]] language information using Dublin Core notation. It is not clear, 
however, that this information is ever used. [[

What do you mean by "is ever used"? Do you mean "is ever used in HTML 
documents"? Or "is ever used by HTML browsers"? Or "is ever used by 
CMS-es"?  (You describe the CMS use case in a preceding paragraph.) Are 
you in fact scepticle about Dublin Core as such? (That, in my view, is 
also a possible reading.) What, in that regard, about the many 
government sites that are using dc.language - examples: 
http://www.government.no and http://www.direct.gov.uk. 

Btw, for this:

]] One implication of HTML5 dropping the meta element for declaring 
language is that there is now no obvious way to provide metadata about 
the document inside the document itself. [[

then I - logically (given the dc.language option etc) suggest to 
replace 'the meta element' with the new phrase that you said you 
standarized on: "the meta element with the http-equiv attribute set to 
Content-Language". Thus:

""" One implication of HTML5 dropping the meta element with the 
http-equiv attribute set to Content-Language for declaring language is 
that there is now no obvious way to provide metadata about the document 
inside the document itself. """

Finally, I suggest that you also mention that HTML5 includes the option 
of registering dc.language or some other value for the meta element's 
@name attribute.
-- 
Leif H Silli
Received on Friday, 2 September 2011 20:28:25 GMT

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