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RE: ISSUE-88 / Re: what's the language of a document ?

From: Richard Ishida <ishida@w3.org>
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 2010 17:35:48 -0000
To: "'Leif Halvard Silli'" <xn--mlform-iua@xn--mlform-iua.no>, "'CE Whitehead'" <cewcathar@hotmail.com>
Cc: <www-international@w3.org>, <public-html@w3.org>, <ian@hixie.ch>
Message-ID: <021401cac20a$74a2faa0$5de8efe0$@org>
I disagree, since it ignores the use of http-equiv="Content-Language" for it's originally specified purpose to describe metadata, where two or more languages may be appropriate regardless of whether you forgot or remembered to declare the language of the element level content using the lang attribute.

RI

============
Richard Ishida
Internationalization Lead
W3C (World Wide Web Consortium)

http://www.w3.org/International/
http://rishida.net/




> -----Original Message-----
> From: Leif Halvard Silli [mailto:xn--mlform-iua@målform.no]
> Sent: 12 March 2010 02:41
> To: CE Whitehead
> Cc: www-international@w3.org; public-html@w3.org; ishida@w3.org;
> ian@hixie.ch
> Subject: Re: ISSUE-88 / Re: what's the language of a document ?
> 
> CE Whitehead, Thu, 11 Mar 2010 20:02:40 -0500:
> > I like Leif's solution--to use the first language specified in http
> > as the text processing language when none is specified in the html
> > tag.
> 
> Perhaps this is something you could live with as well, Ian?
> 
> Otherwise, if at least one more person agrees, then I will formally
> write a change proposal which permits 'http-equiv="Content-Language"'
> to contain more than one language, but only when the root element uses
> the @lang attribute.
> 
> Leif H Silli
> 
> 
> > From: Leif Halvard Silli <>
> > Date: Thu, 11 Mar 2010 08:57:09 +0100
> >> Ian Hickson, Thu, 11 Mar 2010 07:39:08 +0000 (UTC):
> >>> On Thu, 11 Mar 2010, "Martin J. Dürst" wrote:
>     ....
> >>>> As a result, the HTML5 spec best should just say that <meta http-equiv
> >>>> is used primarily as meta-information on the server side and is
> >>>> therefore in general ignored on the client side.
> >>>
> >>> It's not ignored on the client side in practice.
> >
> >> Yes it is. As long as you use the @lang attribute, then META
> >> content-langauge has no effect. Hence servers should be free to use it
> >> as they want = according to the HTTP specs.
> >
> >> So, hereby I propose a compromise solution:
> >
> >> If the HTML document *doesn't* use the @lang attribute on the root
> >> element, then the content-language pragma is forbidden from containing
> >> more than one language tag - and this language tag will also define the
> >> language of the document.
> >
> >> However, if the document does use the @lang attribute on the root
> >> element, then authors are free to use 'http-equiv="Content-Language"'
> >> for what it is meant for according to HTTP.
> > I like this solution.
> [...]
> --
> Leif Halvard Silli
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Received on Friday, 12 March 2010 17:36:21 GMT

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