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RE: Urdu IDNs: Characters in domain names

From: Debbie Garside <md@ictenterprise.co.uk>
Date: Fri, 24 Aug 2007 09:34:39 +0100
To: "'Mark Davis'" <mark.davis@icu-project.org>
Cc: "'Richard Ishida'" <ishida@w3.org>, "'Martin Duerst'" <duerst@it.aoyama.ac.jp>, "'Sarmad Hussain'" <sarmad.hussain@nu.edu.pk>, "'Jonathan Rosenne'" <rosennej@qsm.co.il>, <www-international@w3.org>, <public-iri@w3.org>, <psayo@idrc.org.in>, "'Maria Ng Lee Hoon'" <mng@idrc.org.sg>, "'nayyara.karamat -'" <nayyara.karamat@nu.edu.pk>, <cc@panl10n.net>
Message-ID: <01f701c7e629$9cb2a730$0b00a8c0@CPQ86763045110>
Mark wrote:
 
>I disagree; that strikes me as impractical.
 
It is completely practical.  To do otherwise is totally impractical.
 
>>What would work is if the TLDs are always treated as equivalents (aliases)
in DNS lookup; that way Joe Smith looking at a tourist site could always
type "abc.au" and get the same results as if he had typed " abc.rö".
 
This is what is intended within the ISO NWIP.  The Internationalized Country
Codes are aliases for the Romanized Country Codes.  The planned standard
deals with codes/symbols only, mapped to the Names/codes within ISO 3166-1;
in other words no internationalized country names.
 
Best regards
 
Debbie Garside
 
 


 


  _____  

From: mark.edward.davis@gmail.com [mailto:mark.edward.davis@gmail.com] On
Behalf Of Mark Davis
Sent: 23 August 2007 22:51
To: md@ictenterprise.co.uk
Cc: Richard Ishida; Martin Duerst; Sarmad Hussain; Jonathan Rosenne;
www-international@w3.org; public-iri@w3.org; psayo@idrc.org.in; Maria Ng Lee
Hoon; nayyara.karamat -; cc@panl10n.net
Subject: Re: Urdu IDNs: Characters in domain names


I disagree; that strikes me as impractical.

Fundamentally organizations are going to want TLDs based on their view of
the utility of those TLDs to the majority of users. I can well imagine that
a TLD for Iran might use a character that is not in Arabic; by analogy a TLD
for Austria might reasonably use RÖ (Republik Österreich). 

What would work is if the TLDs are always treated as equivalents (aliases)
in DNS lookup; that way Joe Smith looking at a tourist site could always
type "abc.au" and get the same results as if he had typed " abc.rö".

Mark


On 8/23/07, Debbie Garside <md@ictenterprise.co.uk> wrote: 


Richard wrote:

I think that, if we are to use non-latin
> characters for script-based TLDs, they must only be
> characters that are readily accessible from keyboards of
> people writing any language that uses that script. 

I agree - insofar as is possible.

Best regards

Debbie Garside



> -----Original Message-----
> From: www-international-request@w3.org
<mailto:www-international-request@w3.org> 
> [mailto:www-international-request@w3.org] On Behalf Of Richard Ishida
> Sent: 23 August 2007 19:19
> To: 'Martin Duerst'; 'Sarmad Hussain' 
> Cc: 'Jonathan Rosenne'; www-international@w3.org;
> public-iri@w3.org; psayo@idrc.org.in  <mailto:psayo@idrc.org.in> ; 'Maria
Ng Lee Hoon';
> 'nayyara.karamat -'; cc@panl10n.net
> Subject: RE: Urdu IDNs: Characters in domain names
>
>
> > -----Original Message----- 
> > From: Martin Duerst [mailto:duerst@it.aoyama.ac.jp]
> > Sent: 20 August 2007 07:37
>
> > As an example, consider the TLD for Switzerland, "ch". 
> > Switzerland is a multilingual country with four official languages
> > (see top left of http://www.admin.ch/).
> > It would only be confusing both inside Switzerland as well 
> as outside
> > if different languages used differnt TLDs for Switzerland. For many
> > people, the "ch" is just conventional, best known because
> it appears
> > on the back of many cars. 
> > The "ch" is actually taken from the Latin (language, not
> > script) name of the country, "Confoederatio Helvetica", but many
> > people don't realize that, and for TLDs, it doesn't really matter. 
> > What matters is that people who want to know the TLD of Switzerland
> > can look it up, can remember it, can type it, and so on. It's a
> > benefit if a TLD is easily derivable from the country name 
> (e.g. "fr"
> > for France), but it's not always so, because otherwise,
> there would be
> > clashes. It would be very confusing if a TLD changed depending on
> > language ( e.g. "ge" for Germany in English rather than the current
> > "de" (Deutschland, Germany in German), or "al" for
> Allemagne (Germany
> > in French), or the many other names that Germany has in various 
> > languages. It might help some people a tiny bit, but it
> would make it
> > impossible to send URIs using these TLDs across language
> boundaries,
> > and would lead to conflicts because there are only so many 
> two-letter
> > combinations.
>
> I think it's important to note that this only works well
> because people writing any of the Swiss languages or English
> can easily type the letters 'ch' from their keyboard.  If the 
> TLD had been ch I think there would have been a lot of
> problems.  I think that, if we are to use non-latin
> characters for script-based TLDs, they must only be
> characters that are readily accessible from keyboards of 
> people writing any language that uses that script.
>
>
> RI
>
>
>
>
>










-- 
Mark 
Received on Friday, 24 August 2007 08:39:47 GMT

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