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Re: Invalid relationship between bandwidth and spoken language

From: Najib Tounsi <ntounsi@emi.ac.ma>
Date: Fri, 09 Mar 2007 18:09:03 +0000
Message-ID: <45F1A2BF.8060805@emi.ac.ma>
To: Jonathan Rosenne <rosennej@qsm.co.il>
Cc: www-international@w3.org

Of course, the implication between bandwidth and countries where Arabic 
is spoken was not intended. In fact, I think the author wanted to 
emphasize that it is a bad practice to put it is really a bad practice 
to put dir="rtl" near any marked up RTL text. See example 15, where each 
item in the list has its own dir markup. This example has probably been 
generated by an authoring tool where, if you select a whole list items 
to apply by menu a format "direction>right-to-left", then dir="rtl is 
added to each list item.

Any how, the question remains why we haven't noticed that before. May be 
because we gave to much attention to idea expressed then to the expression.

Thanks to Rotan Hanrahan for spotting that.

Najib


Jonathan Rosenne wrote:
> This was a strange remark. For Arabic or Hebrew texts, little if any 
> bidi markup is needed. dir="rtl" on the HTML will do the work. As the 
> referenced article says, it is only needed for mixed content. And then 
> there is no difference between LTR text contained in an RTL document 
> and RTL text contained in an LTR document.
> Jony
>
>     -----Original Message-----
>     *From:* www-international-request@w3.org
>     [mailto:www-international-request@w3.org] *On Behalf Of *Richard
>     Ishida
>     *Sent:* Friday, March 09, 2007 4:11 PM
>     *To:* 'Rotan Hanrahan'
>     *Cc:* www-international@w3.org
>     *Subject:* RE: Invalid relationship between bandwidth and spoken
>     language
>
>     Fixed.
>     RI
>     ============
>     Richard Ishida
>     Internationalization Lead
>     W3C (World Wide Web Consortium)
>     http://www.w3.org/People/Ishida/
>     http://www.w3.org/International/
>     http://people.w3.org/rishida/blog/
>     http://www.flickr.com/photos/ishida/
>
>         ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>         *From:* www-international-request@w3.org
>         [mailto:www-international-request@w3.org] *On Behalf Of *Rotan
>         Hanrahan
>         *Sent:* 09 March 2007 12:59
>         *To:* www-international@w3.org
>         *Subject:* Invalid relationship between bandwidth and spoken
>         language
>
>         A colleague of mine, working in an Arabic speaking region of
>         the world has pointed out a comment [1] regarding the use of
>         bidi markup, in which it is stated:
>
>         “Removing them will significantly simplify the document, and
>         reduce bandwidth - which may be an important consideration in
>         countries where Arabic is spoken.”
>
>         This line seems to suggest that there is an association
>         between lack of adequate network bandwidth and the speaking of
>         Arabic, an implication I am sure was not intended. Firstly,
>         the effect of bidi markup on bandwidth consumption is
>         negligible compared to the accompanying graphics. Secondly,
>         any saving on payload size should be seen as universally
>         beneficial, not just for countries characterised by the
>         language they speak.
>
>         I suggest that the closing part of that statement (“in
>         countries where Arabic is spoken”) be removed from future
>         revisions, as it is unnecessary and open to misinterpretation.
>
>         ---Rotan.
>
>         [1]
>         _http://www.w3.org/International/geo/html-tech/tech-bidi.html#ri20030726.132037950_
>
>
>     --
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>     08/03/2007 10:58
>


-- 
Najib TOUNSI (mailto:tounsi @ emi.ac.ma)
Ecole Mohammadia d'Ingenieurs, BP 765 Agdal-RABAT Maroc (Morocco)
Phone : +212 (0) 37 68 71 50 (P1711)  Fax : +212 (0) 37 77 88 53
Mobile: +212 (0) 61 22 00 30 
Received on Friday, 9 March 2007 18:09:20 GMT

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