W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-international@w3.org > April to June 2006

Re: Pen-gesture keyboard for Hindi

From: Mark Davis <mark.davis@icu-project.org>
Date: Thu, 13 Apr 2006 06:44:18 -0700
Message-ID: <443E55B2.4030407@icu-project.org>
To: Goutam Kumar Saha <goutam.k.saha@cdackolkata.com>
CC: bruno.girin@cambista.com, cambista@triskeltech.co.uk, Martin Duerst <duerst@it.aoyama.ac.jp>, www-international@w3.org, www-multimodal@w3.org

With few exceptions, it is pretty transparent which characters are typed 
to compose which syllables. And those same pieces are the ones that you 
can see on the tablet. The only real advantage of the tablet, that I can 
see, is that the choices can be more dynamically presented -- on the 
other hand, we've seen lot's of tablet technology being hyped as 
innovative, then sink like a stone in the market.

But perhaps I'm wrong; there's little point to arguing this -- let's 
just wait and look back in a year from now and see how successful this is.

Mark

Goutam Kumar Saha wrote:
> This is for general information that Hindi, Bengali and most of the other
> Indian Languages'  written form is based on syllables and we need to learn
> what combination of keys on a keyboard produce each syllable.
>
> Regards-- Goutam Saha
>
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Bruno Girin (Cambista)" <cambista@triskeltech.co.uk>
> To: "Mark Davis" <mark.davis@icu-project.org>
> Cc: "Martin Duerst" <duerst@it.aoyama.ac.jp>; "Chris Lilley" <chris@w3.org>;
> <www-international@w3.org>; <www-multimodal@w3.org>
> Sent: Wednesday, April 12, 2006 10:29 PM
> Subject: Re: Pen-gesture keyboard for Hindi
>
>
>   
>> Not if you consider that, according to the articles, it is meant to be
>> used by people who have never used a traditional western keyboard and
>> have probably spent all their lives thinking in grapheme clusters rather
>> than individual letters, when they write. I don't know anything about
>> Hindi but I assume that if the language's written form is based on
>> syllables, having to learn what combination of keys on a keyboard
>> produce each syllable can be a hurdle in educating people about
>> computers because they have to first learn a brand new way to write
>> their own language.
>>
>> What I find interesting about this, if I follow the article correctly,
>> is that it provides a fresh look at data input for languages that are
>> not alphabet-based and are typically difficult to input using a keyboard.
>>
>> Maybe it will never prove to be a viable alternative but having someone
>> consider any alternative is good IMHO.
>>
>> Mark Davis wrote:
>>     
>>> Right, but nobody ever used a 1000 key keyboard for Hindi, so the
>>> "news" about it replacing the need for it is a red herring.
>>>
>>> Mark
>>>
>>> Martin Duerst wrote:
>>>       
>>>> At 02:17 06/04/12, Mark Davis wrote:
>>>>         
>>>>> It looks very overblown to me; saw a news report about "a process
>>>>>           
>>>> that would require up to 1,000 keys using a traditional keyboard"
>>>> which is bizarre for Indic.
>>>>
>>>> That range of number suggests that they are thinking about Hindi
>>>> in terms of syllables, treating each grapheme cluster as a unit.
>>>> In practice, there are about 1000-3000 such clusters in practical use.
>>>>
>>>> But this is just a guess.
>>>>
>>>> Regards,   Martin.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>         
>>>>> Mark
>>>>>
>>>>> Chris Lilley wrote:
>>>>>           
>>>>>> Hello ,
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I thought this might be interesting, partly for the I18n aspect
>>>>>>             
>>>> and partly for the pen-based, gesture modality of text entry.
>>>>         
>>>>>>             
> http://www.engadget.com/2006/04/07/hp-provides-deets-on-gesture-keyboard/
>   
> http://www.engadget.com/2006/03/17/hp-indias-gesture-keyboard-for-pen-entry/
>   
>>>>>>
>>>>>>             
>>>>
>>>>         
>>
>>
>> *****************************************
>> This mail is checked by Vexira Antivirus
>>
>>     
>
>
>
>   
Received on Thursday, 13 April 2006 13:51:15 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.2.0+W3C-0.50 : Tuesday, 2 June 2009 19:17:08 GMT