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RE: Comment on LTLI WD

From: Addison Phillips <addison@yahoo-inc.com>
Date: Tue, 2 May 2006 15:00:30 -0700
To: "'Mark Davis'" <mark.davis@icu-project.org>
Cc: "'Felix Sasaki'" <fsasaki@w3.org>, <www-i18n-comments@w3.org>, <public-i18n-core@w3.org>
Message-ID: <001b01c66e33$d5e17d70$9fcd15ac@ds.corp.yahoo.com>

Comments follow...

Addison

Addison Phillips
Internationalization Architect - Yahoo! Inc.

Internationalization is an architecture.
It is not a feature. 

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Mark Davis [mailto:mark.davis@icu-project.org]
> Sent: 2006年5月2日 13:41
> To: Addison Phillips
> Cc: 'Felix Sasaki'; www-i18n-comments@w3.org; public-i18n-core@w3.org
> Subject: Re: Comment on LTLI WD
> 
> >
> > For the last sentence, I would suggest instead:
> > --
> > Locale identifiers usually share certain core features related to
> natural language and country/region. This specification defines locale
> identifiers which specific locale implementations can map to their
> proprietary features in order to create functional, interoperable
> applications.
> >
> ok, except "which" => "that"

Yes.
> >
> ok with that, except that I would stress that this is one of the key
> differences. So
>  >
> 
> One difference between language tags and locale identifiers
> 
> =>
> 
> A major difference between language tags and locale identifiers

+1

> > --
> > This document defines locale identifiers for use in Web technologies.
> Historically, natural language identifiers [RFC 3066bis] have been used to
> infer locales, and, in the absence of a standard for locale interchange,
> were often used by software as the source for locale identification.
> >
> I had actually suggested that that paragraph just be removed. I don't
> like the "used to infer" which actually they have just been used *as
> locale identifiers*. Same with "source". So my suggestion:
> 
> This document defines locale identifiers for use in Web technologies.
> Historically, natural language identifiers [RFC 3066bis] have often been
> used as locale identifiers (with some syntactic changes).
> 
+1, although this would violate my personal use of jargon (where language tags are never locale identifiers, they are used as surrogates thereof). Perhaps:

--
Historically, natural language identifiers [RFC 3066bis] have been used as locale identifiers by some programming languages or operating environments, which is natural since locale identifiers usually share certain core features related to
> natural language and country/region. This specification defines locale
> identifiers which specific locale implementations can map to their
> proprietary features in order to create functional, interoperable
> applications.

You'll note that I've blended another of my previous suggested paragraphs with this one and it actually makes sense :-).
Received on Tuesday, 2 May 2006 22:03:45 GMT

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