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Re: HTML 5 and XHTML 2 combined

From: Molte <molte93@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2009 19:16:20 +0100
Message-ID: <9aa897060901201016x5262a2b4vb1fd1baa10e243a7@mail.gmail.com>
To: "Mark Birbeck" <mark.birbeck@webbackplane.com>
Cc: "Brett Patterson" <inspiron.pattersonb@gmail.com>, www-html@w3.org
It's good you're able to use languages not supported by the browser by using
Ajax, but after all it would be much greater and easy being able to use
those languages directly.

The thrust of the blog post is that I believe that browser vendors
> have less and less 'control' than they used to have. But of course you
> could argue that this is irrelevant, since as long as everyone
> continues to believe that they are so important -- and that they hold
> the key to the success or failure of a standard -- then they will
> remain so.
>
Just to make it clear: I believe browser vendors *should *not have the power
to choose which languages to be used, but still I believe they do. Actually
I think we should show the browser vendors that they're not the only ones
who needs to have something to say (not saying they're not listening to
others).

(I should add that I don't believe that browser vendors have a duty to
> implement anything -- it's their software after all.)
>
I still believe it's crazy having both HTML 5 and XHTML 2, so if it all
happened after by mind, they would not need to support so many languages.

2009/1/20 Mark Birbeck <mark.birbeck@webbackplane.com>

> Hi Molte,
>
> > The problem just might be, that if the browser vendors do not like the
> > language they can simply just avoid supporting it (just like going on a
> > strike). And then what idea is there of a standard that is not supported
> or
> > used?
>
> It's interesting that the Ajax approach opens up the possibility of
> building libraries to support new languages, even if the browser
> vendors have decided not to implement those languages. I'm involved in
> the XForms, XHTML 2 and RDFa specifications at the W3C, and have been
> able to implement XForms and RDFa processors in JavaScript by using
> the techniques pioneered by the Ajax innovators.
>
> (I should add that I don't believe that browser vendors have a duty to
> implement anything -- it's their software after all.)
>
>
> > It's just a question about who has the power to decide the future of the
> > Web. The browser vendors? the coders/developers? "us"? or just everyone
> in
> > cooperation?
>
> This discussion reminds me of a blog post of mine from a few years
> ago, "Ajax makes browser choice irrelevant...but we still need
> standards" [1].
>
> In it I argue that the incredible things that people are doing with
> Ajax libraries allows us to 'hide' the vagaries of different browsers,
> which weakens the power of the browser vendors. Unfortunately, though,
> whilst there are no standards for the Ajax libraries themselves, then
> it makes it difficult for authors to build applications that they feel
> confident could be ported to different libraries, should the need
> arise.
>
> The thrust of the blog post is that I believe that browser vendors
> have less and less 'control' than they used to have. But of course you
> could argue that this is irrelevant, since as long as everyone
> continues to believe that they are so important -- and that they hold
> the key to the success or failure of a standard -- then they will
> remain so.
>
> Regards,
>
> Mark
>
> [1] <
> http://internet-apps.blogspot.com/2006/09/ajax-makes-browser-choice-irrelevantbut.html
> >
>
> --
> Mark Birbeck, webBackplane
>
> mark.birbeck@webBackplane.com
>
> http://webBackplane.com/mark-birbeck
>
> webBackplane is a trading name of Backplane Ltd. (company number
> 05972288, registered office: 2nd Floor, 69/85 Tabernacle Street,
> London, EC2A 4RR)
>



-- 
Hilsen
Molte

CosSinCalc
http://cossincalc.com
Received on Tuesday, 20 January 2009 18:17:02 GMT

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