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Re: name="" deprecated in XHTML

From: David Dorward <david@dorward.me.uk>
Date: Tue, 1 Jul 2008 16:06:41 +0100
Message-Id: <207881E8-E825-4B9B-90CC-FA1C953BA869@dorward.me.uk>
To: w3-html <www-html@w3.org>

On 1 Jul 2008, at 15:39, Sebastian Mendel wrote:
> David Dorward schrieb:
>> On 1 Jul 2008, at 14:20, Sebastian Mendel wrote:
>>> yes, you can do all the things you could do with name also with  
>>> class, but you could also do all the things you can do with class  
>>> with the id
>> No, you can't. @id does not let you mark an element as being part  
>> of a group.
>
> ... in real world, all you can do with classes in (X)HTML could also  
> be done with the id, of course in a more complex way ... but this is  
> not the point

I suppose you could build an id along the lines of class1-class2- 
class3-somethingUnique ... but that would make it *extremely* complex  
to do just about anything with it.

>>> Depending on which element the attribute is applied to.
>
> yes ... in RFC but not in real world

Trying to give the same name to multiple anchors in the same document  
will break things.

>>> it is common to change classes of an element on the fly or dynamic
>> So what?
>
> e.g. changing the style dynamically of an element is done by  
> changing the class

I know why it is done, the question was - what does that have to do  
with your argument?

>>> name shouldn't
>> Why not?
>
> Why?

You were the one who made the assertion, please justify it.

>>> classes are overlapping, names not
>> I have no idea what you mean by that.
>
> Elements with name "a" do not interfere with Elements named "b"
>
> Elements in class "a" can interfere with Elements in class "b"

How?

By default (if we leave microformats aside for the time being), being  
a member of a class doesn't change an element in any way except to  
mark it as being a member of that class. This lack of change includes  
its interactions with and impact on other elements.

A style applied to an element might change the way other elements are  
rendered, but the only connection that has to the class is that a  
class selector might be used (and an attribute selector could be used  
to change it based on the name).

>>> it makes things more clear

>> How so?

> from real world understanding of the two terms class and name

My experience seems to be the reverse of yours. I'd say that name was  
more confusing than class.

-- 
David Dorward
http://dorward.me.uk/
http://blog.dorward.me.uk/
Received on Tuesday, 1 July 2008 15:07:20 GMT

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