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Re: Downloadable fonts and image replacement

From: David Woolley <david@djwhome.demon.co.uk>
Date: Wed, 26 Apr 2006 07:15:44 +0100 (BST)
Message-Id: <200604260616.k3Q6G4K01797@djwhome.demon.co.uk>
To: www-style@w3.org, www-html@w3.org

> level 3, while level 4 would be the equivalent to explicitly offering it=20

Most web sites only require level 2 (and that's all that weft subsetting
supports if you don't explictly extend the sub-set.

> for download to any user). Or at the least would they not charge=20

That's the effect of putting a TTF font on the web!  Anyone can download
it and use it in any web site.  Also, unless you apply a same origin 
policy, which you haven't requested, other sites don't even need to host
the font, they can simply deep link the font resource from another site.

The current, IE, EOT format limits the fonts to use on a named set of sites
(these may well actually include file://c:/, for development use, but that
weakness only really benefits technical users).  This restriction on using
sites is what allows embedding at levels 2 and 3.

> bogus anyway, as for restricted use it doesn=E2=80=99t provide informatio=
> n about=20
> where it can be used, and the field can easily be changed as well. Also,=20

EOT does provide information on where it can be used; effectively the 
proposal was to allow unrestricted fonts to be used without this mechanism - 
you would still need to use something like EOT for level 2 or 3.

> it may always be set to 4 in practice because graphic designers would=20
> likely need to install it on their workstations to use it.

Graphic designers would install the font from the original distribution,
not from an instance "embedded" in a document, so they can, as now, use
fonts with any level of embedding allowed, or none.
Received on Wednesday, 26 April 2006 06:33:14 GMT

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